600 mg cbd oil dosage for 180 lb person

Medical Marijuana Cards

Schedule your appointment today with a licensed marijuana doctor for a renewal or a new medical marijuana card certification at our discounted rate. Get access to natural pain and anxiety medications and start feeling better the natural way!

4 Easy steps:

  1. Book your appointment.
  2. Receive an email confirming your appointment time.
  3. Follow the instructions in the confirmation email and complete an online form through our HIPAA compliant Patient Portal. (Required documentation, permissions, and payment)
  4. Follow the instructions in the confirmation email to attend your appointment.
Get approved online.

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Be prepared to provide proof of state residency, qualifying condition and payment.
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Green Health Docs | $200/$150

Sanctuary Wellness Institute | $199/$199

Natures Way Medicine | $199/$99

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Virtual MMJ Card Certifications
PTSD, Anxiety & Opioid Use Diagnostics
Virtual MMJ Card Certifications

Get approved to use dispensary medications with Medical Marijuana Certifications, LLC. HIPPA, BAA & GDPR Compliant Patient Portal. It’s safe, secure and EASY!

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PTSD, Anxiety & Opioid Use Diagnostics
Virtual MMJ Card Certifications

Join us at local dispensaries and SAVE $25. Our next event is this SATURDAY 1/29/22. Address: 3225 N 5th Street Hwy Suite 1, Reading, PA 19605 9:00am-12:00pm

PTSD, Anxiety & Opioid Use Diagnostics
PTSD, Anxiety & Opioid Use Diagnostics
PTSD, Anxiety & Opioid Use Diagnostics

We now offer DSM-5 Diagnostic Testing for patients who cannot place their medical records. Using this service does not guarantee a successful certification and is fully refundable if you don’t qualify.

Frequently Asked Questions
Frequently Asked Questions
PTSD, Anxiety & Opioid Use Diagnostics

So many questions, so little time. Find your answers here in our online collection of frequently answered questions.

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Frequently Asked Questions
Articles & Research

Are you interested in cannabinoids, terpenes, recipes, legal issues and all things cannabis? Read our blog for more!

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PA Medical Marijuana Dispensaries List
24/7 Online Patient Portal HIPAA, BAA & GPDR Compliant
NJ Medicinal Marijuana Alternative Treatment Centers
NJ Medicinal Marijuana Alternative Treatment Centers
24/7 Online Patient Portal HIPAA, BAA & GPDR Compliant
NJ Medicinal Marijuana Alternative Treatment Centers

New Jersey has a list of all active alternate treatment centers with active product sources. Click to see them all!

24/7 Online Patient Portal HIPAA, BAA & GPDR Compliant
24/7 Online Patient Portal HIPAA, BAA & GPDR Compliant
24/7 Online Patient Portal HIPAA, BAA & GPDR Compliant

Get approved at Medical Marijuana Certifications, LLC

It’s safe, secure and EASY!

Welcome Friends! We LOVE our patients! Giveaways! 100% Online! Same Day 15 Min Service!

Welcome Friends! We LOVE our patients! Giveaways! 100% Online! Same Day 15 Min Service!

Welcome Friends! We LOVE our patients! Giveaways! 100% Online! Same Day 15 Min Service!

Welcome Friends! We LOVE our patients! Giveaways! 100% Online! Same Day 15 Min Service!

Welcome Friends! We LOVE our patients! Giveaways! 100% Online! Same Day 15 Min Service!

Welcome Friends! We LOVE our patients! Giveaways! 100% Online! Same Day 15 Min Service!

PA Medical Marijuana Cards
PA Medical Marijuana Cards
PA Medical Marijuana Cards

Pennsylvania has 23 approved medical conditions. Our doctor will certify that you have one of these preexisting conditions and that you are a legal Pennsylvania resident.

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PA Medical Marijuana Cards
PA Medical Marijuana Cards

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NJ Medical Marijuana Cards
PA Medical Marijuana Cards
NJ Medical Marijuana Cards

New Jersey has 17 approved medical conditions. Our doctor will certify that you have one of these preexisting conditions and that you are a legal New Jersey resident.

PA Approved Medical Conditions
How to Prepare for Your Tele-Health Session
PA Approved Medical Conditions

Pennsylvania has 23 approved medical conditions. Our doctor will certify that you have one of these preexisting conditions and that you are a legal Pennsylvania resident.

NJ Approved Medical Conditions
How to Prepare for Your Tele-Health Session
PA Approved Medical Conditions

New Jersey has 17 approved medical conditions. Our doctor will certify that you have one of these preexisting conditions and that you are a legal New Jersey resident.

How to Prepare for Your Tele-Health Session
How to Prepare for Your Tele-Health Session
How to Prepare for Your Tele-Health Session

Nervous about your session or just like to be prepared? This link is just for you!

NJ State Registration Website
NJ State Registration Website
How to Prepare for Your Tele-Health Session

NJ DOH MMP Registration website | New Jersey | You will need to register with the state AFTER approval from our doctor. All needed information about registering is INSIDE our intake form.

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NJ State Registration Website
PA State Registration Website

We LOVE our patients!

Medical Marijuana Certifications, LLC is giving away a FREE MMJ card consultation. Like, Share, Comment and win a FREE certification visit.

PA State Registration Website
NJ State Registration Website
PA State Registration Website

PA DOH MMP Registration Website | Pennsylvania | You will need to have an active account with the Department of Health BEFORE our doctor can approve you. All needed information about registering is INSIDE our intake form.

See our FAQ Page for more!

Visit our online HIPAA portal or call to schedule an appointment. Pennsylvania and New Jersey. More
Medical Marijuana Certifications, LLC

219 South Main Avenue, Scranton, Pennsylvania 18504, United States

SERVING ALL PENNSYLVANIA AND NEW JERSEY RESIDENTS To contact a member of our staff directly with any questions, comments, or scheduling inquiries you may have. 717-220-5566 [email protected]

Live Reception | Monday – Friday: 9am – 9pm | (717) 220-5566

Monday – Friday: 9am – 9pm (717) 220-5566

Fax documents to (844) 929-1545

Saturday: By Appointment

Sunday: By Appointment

24/7 Online Patient Portal

ONLINE MEDICAL MARIJUANA ID CARDS IN 4 EASY STEPS

Schedule Your Appointment

Choose your state of residence and between INITIAL Certification or Annual RENEWAL. (Currently PA and NJ. More states coming soon!) A picture of a current or expired Patient ID Card is required for our discount.

Complete A Brief Intake Form

After booking, you will receive an email with an online form to complete.

(Be prepared to provide proof of state residency, qualifying condition and payment.)

Pennsylvania- You will need to have an active account with the Department of Health BEFORE.

New Jersey- You will need to register with the state AFTER approval from our doctor.

All needed information about registering is INSIDE our intake form.

ZOOM With the Doctor

All of our doctors are approved and registered with the Department of Health. They will review your files and meet you on your ZOOM video link at your scheduled time. Each state has a list of medically qualifying conditions. Our doctors certify that you have one of these conditions and are a legal resident. They will ask if you have any questions about using medical marijuana and certify you for the state program. You will receive 24/7 Dispensary Verification for 12 months.

Pay State Fee & Watch Your Mail

Your card will arrive approximately 7-10 days from your payment date.

Go Shopping & Start Feeling Better!

Don’t forget to contact your local dispensary BEFORE your initial visit. Most are requiring online applications, pre-orders and phone consultations. Please be advised that you will need to bring your PATIENT ID CARD and STATE ISSUED PHOTO ID for every dispensary purchase. Please drive responsibly!

For More Information Visit Our FAQ Page!

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

This antioxidant may be helpful for diabetes and nerve pain

Cathy Wong is a nutritionist and wellness expert. Her work is regularly featured in media such as First For Women, Woman's World, and Natural Health.

Arno Kroner, DAOM, LAc, is a board-certified acupuncturist, herbalist, and integrative medicine doctor practicing in Santa Monica, California.

Verywell / Anastasia Tretiak

What Is Alpha-Lipoic Acid?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a fatty acid found naturally inside every cell of the human body. Its primary role is to convert blood sugar (glucose) into energy using oxygen, a process referred to as aerobic metabolism.

It is also considered an antioxidant, meaning that it can neutralize harmful compounds called free radicals that damage cells at the genetic level.

ALA is made in your body, but it is also available from certain foods and as a supplement.

ALA supplements are marketed for a multitude of health conditions, but there is little evidence to support their use. This article reviews the potential uses of ALA. It also covers side effects and possible interactions.

Dietary supplements are not regulated in the United States, meaning the FDA does not approve them for safety and effectiveness before products are marketed. When possible, choose a supplement that has been tested by a trusted third party, such as USP, ConsumerLabs, or NSF. However, even if supplements are third-party tested by a trusted source, that doesn't mean they are necessarily safe for all or effective in general. It is important to talk to your health care provider about any supplements you plan to take and to check in about any potential interactions with other supplements or medications.

Supplement Facts

  • Active ingredient: Lipoic acid
  • Alternate Name(s): Lipoid acid, thioctic acid
  • Recommended Dose: Generally, 600-1,200 mg daily
  • Safety Considerations: Generally safe, may interfere with some medications, may cause mild gastrointestinal side effects

Uses of Alpha-Lipoic Acid

Supplement use should be individualized and vetted by a health care professional, such as a registered dietitian, pharmacist, or doctor. No supplement is intended to treat, cure, or prevent a disease.

Many alternative health care providers contend that ALA can prevent or manage a multitude of health conditions, including alcoholic liver disease, HIV, Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disorder, high blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis, schizophrenia, erectile dysfunction, and more. To date, there is little evidence to support any of these claims.

Much of the research involving ALA has been centered on the management of diabetes and nerve pain. The following are some of the potential uses of ALA.

Diabetes

ALA may aid in the control of glucose by speeding up the metabolism of blood sugar. This could potentially help manage diabetes, a disease characterized by high blood glucose levels.

A 2018 systematic review and meta-analysis of 20 randomized controlled trials looked at ALA use in people with metabolic disorders. Some had type 2 diabetes, and others had other metabolic disorders. It found that ALA supplementation lowered fasting blood glucose, insulin concentration, insulin resistance, and blood hemoglobin A1C levels. Hemoglobin A1C is a measurement of glucose control over the previous six months.

Another systematic review and meta-analysis that evaluated 19 studies concluded ALA reduced fasting blood glucose and hemoglobin A1C levels.

However, a more recent systematic review found that ALA supplementation reduced insulin and insulin resistance but did not reduce hemoglobin A1C levels.

People with diabetes should discuss with their health care provider if supplementing with ALA would be appropriate for their individual needs.

Recap

Alpha-lipoic acid may reduce glucose levels and improve insulin resistance. Further research is needed to determine if the supplement is beneficial to people with diabetes.

Nerve Pain

Neuropathy is the medical term used to describe the pain, numbness, and abnormal sensations caused by nerve damage. The damage is often caused by the oxidative stress placed on the nerves by chronic diseases such as diabetes, Lyme disease, shingles, thyroid disease, kidney failure, and HIV.

A clinical trial published in 2021 found that people with pain from unknown causes reported less-severe pain scores when they took 400-800 mg of an oral ALA supplement as compared to those taking a placebo.

ALA may also have antioxidant effects in people with diabetic neuropathy, a potentially debilitating condition experienced in people with advanced diabetes.

A 2012 review of studies from the Netherlands concluded that a daily 600-mg intravenous dose of ALA given over three weeks provided "significant and clinically relevant reduction in neuropathic pain."

In addition, a second review of studies found that a dose of 300-600 mg per day given intravenously for two to four weeks was shown to be safe and to improve neuropathy symptoms.

However, since the dose was provided intravenously in these two studies, the results can't be applied to taking oral supplements.

Recap

Alpha-lipoic acid may help relieve symptoms of nerve pain and neuropathy. If you are experiencing pain or have neuropathy, talk to your health care provider about whether this supplement will benefit you.

Weight Loss

ALA's ability to enhance calorie burning and promote weight loss has been exaggerated by many diet gurus and supplement manufacturers. In addition, much of the research on supplementing ALA for weight loss is preliminary and does not provide firm conclusions.

A 2017 review of studies from Yale University found that ALA supplements, ranging in doses from 300 mg to 1,800 mg daily, helped prompt an average weight loss of 2.8 pounds compared to a placebo.

Another review of studies published in 2018 similarly found that ALA resulted in more weight loss compared to placebo. However, the average weight loss was only 1.5 pounds.

An additional meta-analysis published in 2020 found that treatment with ALA significantly reduced BMI and reduced weight by about 5 pounds as compared to a placebo.

While these three systematic reviews offer some promising evidence, the study methods varied greatly among the individual studies included. As a result, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions from them. For example, the studies used different dosage amounts and looked at different outcomes over a range of time periods, from 10 weeks to 52 weeks. A few studies also had participants on calorie-restricted diets.

Although the reviews found a statistically significant difference in the amount of weight lost between treatment and placebo groups, the clinical significance of a 1- to 5-pound weight loss in people who are overweight and obese must be considered.

Recap

ALA supplements may help you take off a few pounds, but the evidence is still inconclusive. Lifestyle changes, such as following a healthy diet and getting regular physical activity, will do far more for those seeking to shed pounds.

Heart Disease

ALA has long been believed to influence weight and health by altering the lipid (fat) composition in the blood. This includes increasing “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while lowering “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. However, recent research suggests this may not be so.

In a 2011 study from Korea, 180 adults given 1,200 to 1,800 mg of ALA lost 21 percent more weight than the placebo group after 20 weeks. However, they experienced no improvements in total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, or triglycerides. In fact, higher doses of ALA were connected to increases in total cholesterol and LDL in the study's participants. A 2019 study also found no improvements in serum lipids with ALA.

However, there is some evidence that ALA can reduce markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, interlekin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. High levels of C-reactive protein are considered a risk factor for heart disease.

A 2019 systematic review and meta-analysis found a significant reduction in those three markers with supplementation of ALA. In addition, another study published in 2020 found that 600 mg ALA given orally for four months significantly reduced these same markers.

Recap

Alpha-lipoic acid may aid in heart disease prevention through reducing inflammation rather than cholesterol levels.

Primary Mitochondrial Disorders

ALA supplementation has been recommended in patients with primary mitochondrial disorders, or PMDs. PMDs are rare and are considered an inborn error of metabolism, limiting the body's ability to make energy within cells.

There is very little evidence to support the use of ALA in this population. Most of the evidence is based on case reports simply because the disorders are so rare.

People with PMDs should be monitored by a team of specialists who focus on these complex metabolic disorders.

Since the body can make ALA, deficiency is extremely rare. Generally, healthy people can produce all of the ALA the body needs.

Side Effects

ALA is generally considered safe when taken as an oral supplement or used as a topical ointment. It has also been found to be safe when given intravenously.

Common side effects of ALA supplementation may include headache, fatigue, diarrhea, skin rash, muscle cramp, or a tingling "pins and needles" sensation. The side effects tend to be mild and will typically resolve once treatment is stopped.

Since ALA is an acid, it may contribute to reflux. Gastric reflux has been reported with doses ranging from 800-1800 mg daily.

There has been one report of seizures and vomiting in children who were taking doses of 2,400 mg or greater.

Recap

ALA is considered safe when taken intravenously or as a supplement. In most adults, side effects may occur but are generally mild and resolve when supplementation is stopped. ALA is not recommended for children or pregnant or lactating women.

Precautions

Supplementation of ALA in children has not been carefully studied. Therefore, it is not recommended for children.

It is not recommended for pregnant and lactating women.

It is also suggested to discontinue supplementing ALA supplementation for two weeks prior to a planned surgery.

Dosage: How Much Alpha-Lipoic Acid Should I Take?

Always speak with a health care provider before taking a supplement to ensure that the supplement and dosage is appropriate for your individual needs.

While it is considered safe, there are no guidelines directing the appropriate use of ALA.

Most oral supplements are sold in formulations ranging from 100 to 600 mg. A dose of 600-1200 mg daily appears to be the most common in studies. This is typically divided into three equal doses each day.

Based on current evidence, a maximum daily dose of up to 1,800 mg is presumed to be safe in adults.

What Happens If I Take Too Much Alpha-Lipoic Acid?

Since ALA is not an essential nutrient, there is no recommended amount to get in your diet or through supplements. There also is no set upper intake limit.

If you take too much ALA, you may experience some of the side effects discussed above, but they tend to resolve when the supplement is discontinued.

Interactions

It is essential to carefully read the ingredient list and nutrition facts panel of a supplement to know which ingredients and how much of each ingredient is included. Review this supplement label with your health care provider to discuss any potential interactions with foods, other supplements, and medications.

ALA may slow blood clotting and increase the risk of bleeding. If you are also on blood thinners, your health care provider should be monitoring you closely. Discuss with your provider whether ALA supplements are appropriate for you.

People with diabetes who take ALA supplements may experience further reductions in blood glucose levels if they're also taking medications to lower glucose. If you have diabetes, discuss with your provider whether ALA supplements are appropriate for you. If you take this supplement, be sure to monitor your blood glucose levels closely.

Finally, ALA may affect thyroid function and treatment. If you have thyroid disease or are taking thyroid medications, talk to your health care provider before taking ALA.

Large doses of ALA have led to toxicity in animals that were deficient in thiamine (vitamin B1). Therefore, people at risk for thiamine deficiency should consider supplementing thiamine along with ALA.

Since ALA is an antioxidant, there is a theoretical risk that it may interfere with the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Any nutritional supplementation should be discussed with an oncologist if you are undergoing cancer treatment.

Recap

ALA may affect thyroid function and treatment and could potentially interfere with chemotherapy. Those who have a thiamine deficiency or diabetes, or who take blood thinners, should be especially careful about using ALA supplements. Check with your health care provider to be sure this and any other supplement you’re considering is safe for you.

How to Store Alpha-Lipoic Acid

Like most nutritional supplements, ALA can be stored in a cool and dry place.

Sources of Alpha-Lipoic Acid and What To Look For

Food Sources

Food sources of ALA include red meats, carrots, spinach, beets, broccoli, potatoes, tomatoes, Brussel sprouts, and peas.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid Supplements

Supplements are mostly available as capsules, with suggested serving sizes ranging from 300-1200 mg daily.

ALA supplements are available as R- or S-isomers. A mixed form is the most common. Products containing only the R-isomer tend to be more expensive.

Summary

ALA is a fatty acid that functions as an antioxidant and is needed to produce energy within cells. Our bodies make ALA on their own, and we also get some through our diet.

ALA is also available as a nutritional supplement and has been marketed for use in several health conditions. However, the bulk of the research suggests a possible benefit for people with diabetes and neuropathies. If used for weight loss, it should be taken in conjunction with diet modification and exercise.

If you feel that you may benefit from this supplement, be sure to discuss with your health care provider the benefits and risks to determine if it is appropriate for you.

Frequently Asked Questions

ALA may help to manage blood sugar associated with diabetes and ease neuropathy pain. There is less evidence it helps with weight loss.

There is no evidence to confirm that ALA can help you sleep. In fact, insomnia can be a side effect of the supplement. However, ALA may reduce pain from neuropathy, which may help people with the condition to sleep better.

ALA has anti-inflammatory properties. However, it does not work in the same way as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It may help to reduce systemic inflammation over time, but you will not notice any immediate effects.

You don't need to get ALA from food. The body makes ALA through a series of biochemical processes involving fatty acids, proteins, and an enzyme known as lipoic acid synthase. If you eat a nutritious diet and you are healthy, your body will have all the raw materials it needs to make ALA.

An ALA deficiency is practically unheard of. Rare genetic mutations have been described in medical literature in which the body is unable to produce lipoic acid synthase. It is estimated that fewer than one in a million people are affected.

Here's how much marijuana it would take to kill you

Nearly half of Americans say they have tried marijuana at least once in their life.

With more people lighting up than ever (and nine states voting on the legalization of marijuana on Election Day), it’s important to remember how many fatally overdose on the drug.

Zip. Zero. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which collects data on a range of other substances, both legal and illicit, and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

For comparison, opioids, which include prescription pain relievers and heroin, killed more than 28,000 Americans in 2014. Nearly 88,000 people die from alcohol-related causes every year, which makes alcohol the fourth leading preventable cause of the death in the US.

It’s pretty impossible to ingest a lethal dose of marijuana.

David Schmader, author of “Weed: The User’s Guide ,” spoke with experts and crunched the numbers on how much bud it would take to kill someone.

“Even aspirin can kill you if you take too much, but a fatal dose of marijuana would require ingestion of fifteen hundred pounds in fifteen minutes — a physical impossibility for any human, even Snoop Dogg,” Schmader writes in his book.

This handy diagram from “Weed: The User’s Guide” might help:

One reason for this impossibility is the way the brain works. When a user ingests marijuana, chemicals in the plant ride the nervous system to the brain and latch onto molecules called cannabinoid receptors. Those little holding cells influence pleasure, memory, coordination, and cognition, among other functions, which is why getting high affects thinking and behavior.

Cannabinoid receptors are not found in the brainstem areas that control breathing. Thus, ” lethal overdoses from c annabis and cannabinoids do not occur,” The National Cancer Institute explains.

Marijuana isn’t harmless, however. The psychoactive ingredient that gets users high, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is a powerful intoxicant. Having physical abilities and judgments impaired can lead users to put themselves in unsafe situations.

And while there are no recorded cases of deaths from marijuana overdose, one bong rip too many can make users feel incredibly uncomfortable. Their heart starts to race, hands tremble, and anxiety strikes. There are things they can do to mitigate a “What I have done?” high.

In his book, Schmader recommends users tell themselves that they’re in no real danger.

Drink some water to stay hydrated and eat a snack — preferably one that is ready-to-eat and does not require operating a stove — to boost your blood sugar . Call up a trusted friend, Schmader says, or Google search ” Maureen Dowd Colorado” to feel less alone.