cbd oil for cats nausea

Managing Your Cat’s Nausea With Hemp Oil

Nausea is a problem that impacts a broad variety of cats. While hairballs aren’t uncommon with most breeds of cats, true nausea can be a seriously problematic concern. Thankfully, Phytocannabinoid Rich (PCR) Hemp Oil can be used as a light treatment for nausea in many cats.

PCR Hemp Oil Has Anti-Nausea Benefits

PCR Hemp oil for pets has been linked to many positive anti-nausea benefits. Cats who are having a hard time adjusting to a new food or who have a weak stomach often end up getting sick regularly. While nausea and vomiting can be a positive benefit for sick cats who ate something bad, it can also be a distracting and even painful situation. This is especially true if they are suffering from persistent nausea.

Giving Hemp Oil To A Cat

While Hemp may be beneficial for many cats as an anti-nausea tool, not every feline will tolerate it. PCR hemp oil is not an item that will upset a stomach or confuse a cat. However, cats can be notoriously fickle with their food and may avoid it if it smells differently than normal. That’s why it is important to implement it slowly over a lengthy period.

In this way, the cat can get more acclimated to it. If your cat tolerates the hemp oil and you notice signs that their nausea and vomiting behaviors have decreased, add small levels of it to their food until you can give them a full dose.

If you think that hemp oil would be a beneficial tool for your cat’s nausea, please don’t hesitate to contact us today. While it is not a medical treatment and shouldn’t be treated as one, it does have benefits that may be crucial for your poor kitty.

Cbd Oil For Pain & Nausea?

My 4-year-old Balinese cat Little Kitty is recovering from stomatitis and the resulting full-mouth extraction. She got the last of her teeth out almost two weeks ago, but the bloody ulcers and inflamation haven’t gone away. To make things worse, she has had extreme nausea and vomiting for the past few days–like, really frightening style. We took her to the vet’s for the second time this week, they had us stop the Metacam she had been on, and gave her an anti-nausea injection, B-12, fluids, and a steroid shot. Vet visits like this have been a weekly thing for 2 months. I am going broke and also I feel very sorry for the cat to be so experimented upon. She has been pumped with chemicals: metacam, various steroids, bupronorphine, amytriptiline, antibiotics, cyclosporin, anti-nausea concoction, fentanyl, etc etc. She just keeps getting more and more messed up health-wise and must be exhausted too. Needless to say this scenario is starting to freak me out. And, guess what, weed is legal in my state.

So, my question is, can I make weed ghee for the cat? How much should she get? Is it okay for her to have some clarified butter (I am gussing so since the vet suggested I hide the cyclosporin in butter). If she’s not on medication of some kind, her mouth hurts too much to eat. And something in there is making her stomach really toxic, so she can’t keep food down too well anyway. Since there is no legal issue, I would love some unbiased advice about this. We don’t even use it, but it is extremely easy and cost-effective to get now that it’s not against the law. It seems like a much more natural solution for a suffering kitty.

Let me know, thank you! And, moderators, I hope this is okay (I figured it would be considering current legal status?)

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auntie
TCS Member
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*UPDATE*
after some googling I am pretty convinced that THC is not good for cats. So I can’t just feed her weed ghee. But CBD oil seems to do the trick; I had never heard of this, personally, but a friend has confirmed its existence. Do you have to get it in a dispensary? Should be no problem around here; I can just say I have a headache or something and get a card. Or can you send away for it? I would obviously prefer that, but am skeptical of websites (afraid of being swindled).

Any experience with this? Thanks so much!

mrsgreenjeens
Every Life Should Have Nine Cats
lilin
TCS Member

I would definitely say you want to seek out CBD oil with the lowest THC amount possible. While toxicity from marijuana is rare in animals, cats aren’t quite as effective at filtering THC as we are, and can be more prone to serious side afffects than humans. Unlike humans, THC overdose can occur with large amounts.

But what I am seeing about CBD specifically is that it has been used to treat pain in animals without this complication, and has been especially helpful to cats actually. I am not sure where CBD oil would be available, but a dispensary that focuses on medical strains might be a good bet, as CBD is primarily a medicinal extract with no high. You can call and ask, of course. Also be sure to look into dosing and see if there is a vet in your area who has some sort of knowledge about this treatment.

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auntie
TCS Member
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missmimz
TCS Member
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auntie
TCS Member
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missmimz
TCS Member
t_atom
TCS Member
Ladewyn
TCS Member
daftcat75
TCS Member

1:1?! I tried 1:1 with a very small dose and my Krista was just so stoned that night. I put on her cat rock (Music For Cats) and sat next to her petting her until she came down. I don’t feel like she can tolerate enough THC to get a meaningful amount of CBD in her.

Krista gets a 20:1 (20 times more CBD than THC) for inflammation and nausea that comes with IBD, pancreatitis, and old age.

daftcat75
TCS Member

My vet is on board as much as she is legally allowed to be. Meaning she can’t legally provide me any guidance without jeopardizing her license (schedule 1 drug) but, off the record, she has no objections.

My recommendation is to list off the other prescriptions your cat is receiving and check with either your vet or Google whether there is going to be an interaction. CBD alone is very safe. But it does use the very popular Cytochrome 450 enzyme pathway in the liver to metabolize. Other drugs which also use the Cy450 pathway will take longer to clear. Hence if you use CBD and bupe (buprenorphine) together, (I don’t recommend this) the sedative effect of both will be enhanced and it will take longer to pass.

Ladewyn
TCS Member
daftcat75
TCS Member

For my Krista, the alternatives would be an anti-emetic like cerenia plus an appetite stimulant like mirtazapine, plus something for inflammation like pred plus an analgesic like buprenorphine. I’ve been able to replace four drugs and their side effects and toxicities with one that has far better safety with far less side effects.

There’s a very counterproductive chicken-and-egg problem involved in waiting for the research. The FDA has said there is no medical value. So researchers haven’t been wanting or able to research it. That’s changing for CBD but it’s going to be awhile for the body of research to catch up with the anecodotal evidence.

If you have the good fortune of a healthy cat, it may seem risky to conduct experimental treatment on her. But if you’ve seen disease rob you of your loved one and you have read the myriad of stories and problems with traditional treatments, you may be more open to alternatives.

Do your research. Consult Google. Talk to your vet. Do as much due dilligence as you can. But recognize that you may end up knowing more about CBD than your vet. Because they aren’t allowed to prescribe it, they don’t study it as a treatment option.

Ladewyn
TCS Member

I will say this really isn’t true. I’m in vet school; it’s something we do discuss, and have had people who research it talk with us specifically about the research. So no, it’s not something being totally ignored by veterinary research. It’s just still relatively early in research. I hoping to see more, I think it’s promising, and it definitely seems to be gaining traction.

I do understand your situation is a difficult one, and difficult decisions mean you take more risks. This is why I specifically said I won’t tell anyone what they *should* do, only what I personally would do. I would turn to other forms of pain management that we better understand first, and try them with different vets before escalating to an unknown without veterinary supervision. Again, that’s *me* personally, I get that others are fine experimenting without that supervision, and everyone has to make that decision for themselves.

daftcat75
TCS Member

That’s good to hear that it’s being discussed in vet school now. But I’m willing to stake my cat’s health that most of the vets licensed and practicing today never had those discussions when they were in vet school. I’m glad to hear things are changing. But Krista and I won’t be waiting for that change to reach the vet’s office and approved DVM practices.

I have read so many heartbreaking case studies on ibdkitties.net where it seemed like they were chasing symptoms and treating side effects. Their prescriptions were requiring more prescriptions. Pred causing diabetes, bupe making cats too stoned to eat, cerenia leading cats to hide all day. I do have some experience giving Krista Cerenia, bupe, and meowzapine (mirtazapine.). Only the last one I’ll give her again because we worked out the dose to reduce the crazies. The others were counterproductive to her healing.

That said, if she goes in for another dental procedure, we’ll definitely take the bupe and antibiotics. I may be maverick but I’m not stupid.

daftcat75
TCS Member

My 4-year-old Balinese cat Little Kitty is recovering from stomatitis and the resulting full-mouth extraction. She got the last of her teeth out almost two weeks ago, but the bloody ulcers and inflamation haven’t gone away. To make things worse, she has had extreme nausea and vomiting for the past few days–like, really frightening style. We took her to the vet’s for the second time this week, they had us stop the Metacam she had been on, and gave her an anti-nausea injection, B-12, fluids, and a steroid shot. Vet visits like this have been a weekly thing for 2 months. I am going broke and also I feel very sorry for the cat to be so experimented upon. She has been pumped with chemicals: metacam, various steroids, bupronorphine, amytriptiline, antibiotics, cyclosporin, anti-nausea concoction, fentanyl, etc etc. She just keeps getting more and more messed up health-wise and must be exhausted too. Needless to say this scenario is starting to freak me out. And, guess what, weed is legal in my state.

So, my question is, can I make weed ghee for the cat? How much should she get? Is it okay for her to have some clarified butter (I am gussing so since the vet suggested I hide the cyclosporin in butter). If she’s not on medication of some kind, her mouth hurts too much to eat. And something in there is making her stomach really toxic, so she can’t keep food down too well anyway. Since there is no legal issue, I would love some unbiased advice about this. We don’t even use it, but it is extremely easy and cost-effective to get now that it’s not against the law. It seems like a much more natural solution for a suffering kitty.

Let me know, thank you! And, moderators, I hope this is okay (I figured it would be considering current legal status?)

Not a doctor or a vet so take with a grain of salt.

CBD is likely not strong enough for post-surgery pain. In my personal experience (back pain), it’s good for chronic pain but not so much for acute pain. If they gave you an analgesic for post-surgery, use that.

CBD oil is good for anti-nausea. It can disable the retching reaction much like Cerenia does.

It is very likely that CBD and whatever analgesic they have given you both have to be metabolized by the same liver enzymes. They can cause each other to last longer and induce more sedation. Consult with your vet about that.

So if you can get a vet to consult, do that first. Otherwise, if you’re going to try it anyway, go low and slow. Low dose (half what the bottle recommends) and long period between doses (12 hours to start) until you can see if and how it’s going to interact with your other prescriptions.