cbd oil for cvs

CVS Begins Selling CBD Products in 8 States

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — CVS Health Corp. has debuted cannabidiol (CBD) products in select stores in eight states. The products, which include topical creams, sprays, roll-ons, lotions and salves, are available in various CVS stores in Alabama, California, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland and Tennessee, a spokesperson for the company told CSP Daily News.

CVS is not selling CBD-infused supplements, food additives or edibles, the company said.

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is gaining popularity among consumers,” the spokesperson said. “Anecdotally, we’ve heard from our customers that these products have helped with pain relief for arthritis and other ailments.”

In late 2018, the U.S. Farm Bill essentially legalized products made from hemp that contain CBD oils, so long as they contain less than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive chemical in marijuana.

CBD has enjoyed rapid market growth due to its alleged medicinal qualities and the product category is expected to reach $5 billion in sales by 2027, according to CBD research firm New Frontier Data, Washington; however, there are still plenty of questions regarding its safety and legality, causing concern and hesitation among retailers to get involved.

CVS began selling the CBD products in mid-March.

“This is our initial entry into this emerging product category that we think is something consumers are going to be looking for as part of their health care offering,” the CVS spokesperson said. “We’re going to walk slowly into this new category and continue to actively monitor the regulatory landscape for CBD products, and will expand product availability as appropriate and in compliance with applicable laws.”

Woonsocket, R.I.-based CVS Health has nearly 10,000 retail drugstores and more than 1,100 walk-in medical clinics nationwide. The company is a leading pharmacy benefits manager with more than 22 million medical benefit members and 68,000 retail network pharmacies.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Mitch Morrison asked the room of retailers one question as the final panel of this year’s Convenience Retailing University commenced: “How many of you know what CBD is?” Roughly half the room raised their hands.

“Now, how many of you are selling CBD in your stores?” asked Morrison, vice president of retailer relations for Winsight Media, CSP’s parent company. Crickets.

CBD—the nonpsychoactive ingredient in marijuana or hemp—was one of the hottest topics at this year’s event in Orlando, Fla. The final panel, which featured experts in retail and cannabis, offered insights into what the product is, market opportunities, the regulatory landscape and merchandising strategies for convenience stores.

Here’s how retailers can approach CBD and what they can expect in the upcoming months regarding its regulations …

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the agency that crafted last year’s Farm Bill, is making guidelines for various states to cultivate hemp and make it legal, said Rachel Gillette, partner and chair of the cannabis law practice firm Greenspoon Marder LLP, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. This means retailers will have to craft their CBD plan-o-grams around these regulations, especially for CBD edibles, which have been forcibly removed from certain states over the past few months.

“The FDA will come out with a pathway for us to see CBD in foods or as a dietary supplement,” she said. “That would give a lot of states and retailers clarity and cure any confusion.”

These programs are also essential for law enforcement officials, who often ignore or confuse the difference between CBD and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis .

“If we have this conversation a year from now, it’ll be a very different legal environment,” she said.

There appears to be a combination of excitement and caution regarding CBD among retailers. Erin Butler, senior category manager for West Des Moines, Iowa-based Kum & Go LC, said that although she hopes the chain is selling CBDs within the next year, it is still a hypothetical situation until the regulations unfold.

“We don’t want to risk any legal ramifications,” she said. “We’re exploring, talking with suppliers and making plan-o-grams for our stores. But we won’t act until we know that we can, legally.”

Although there is no age restriction for CBD yet, many retailers plan to display the product behind the counter like tobacco products. This is exactly how Kum & Go will approach the category, Butler said.

“We’ll have it behind the counter in a display and have educational materials, similar to buying Sudafed at a drugstore,” she said.

Nik Modi, managing director for RBC Capital Markets, New York, compared today’s CBD hype to the early stages of e-cigarettes: people are talking, they’re excited, but they don’t know how to approach it.

The lesson retailers can learn from this comparison is that research is critical, he said. Such research includes diving into the manufacturer’s history, what their products are and if they’re well-capitalized.

“Everyone wants to chase the trend, but there’s no guidance and infrastructure,” he said. “I’d urge everyone to take your time about how you approach the category.”

Gillette concurred, also suggesting retailers question their CBD suppliers on where their products are manufactured, their general production process, and, most importantly, on lab results. Confirming that CBD products don’t contain more than 0.3% THC—the legal limit per product, according to the Farm Bill—goes a long way, she said.

“There are labs that are certified to test CBD, and you’ll want to call and verify those test results,” she said. “Even if you’re unknowingly selling CBD oil that contains more than 0.3% THC, you can be arrested.”

Despite the murky waters, suppliers can still help retailers make CBD distribution a seamless process. Such support includes offering as many educational tools as possible, including pamphlets and brochures, and ensuring their products contain absolutely zero THC, said Floyd Landis, founder of Floyd’s of Leadville, Leadville, Colo.

“Some companies, even if they don’t say it, are selling hemp-derived products with more THC than considered safe,” he said. “The safest thing we can do is remove THC entirely and educate consumers. It’s an unnecessary risk to have any levels of THC at all in these products.”

CBD has been touted as a budding product and surging category for retailers. But is that what it really is? Modi argues that retailers shouldn’t think of CBD as a product or a category, but as an ingredient—and one that will emerge in nearly every area of the store, he said.

“CBD is like nicotine and caffeine: It has functional benefits and will be placed in many products in your stores,” he said. “That’s how this category is going to evolve. Don’t pigeonhole yourself into thinking this is its own category—it’s an ingredient that will arrive in every category.”

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A New Way To Obtain CBD Oil: CVS Pharmacy

As the CBD industry coasts towards a brightly positive future following the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, a new purchasing avenue is opening up and it will give people across the country much easier access to CBD oil: the CVS Pharmacy . Since recent months have produced astounding results for the CBD industry and its fight to legalize the compound, more and more establishments, brands, and organizations are offering CBD products. And the latest to join this troupe is CVS Pharmacies.

CBD Gum, Creams, and Sprays? What You Can Expect To Find

While this announcement is undoubtedly another move in the right direction for the CBD industry, CVS’s decision to sell these products ( CBD gum , topicals, etc.) isn’t being applied unilaterally. Approximately 800 stores (of their 9,800 locations) across 8 different states will become authorized to sell various topical CBD creams, lotions, and salves. These states include the following:

  • Alabama
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kentucky
  • Maryland
  • Tennessee

However, CVS has expressed interest to strictly abide by certain laws and regulations that would prevent them from selling any edibles or food additives, and force them to approach their marketing very carefully.

While hemp and its derivatives are now classified as agricultural commodities, the FDA still hasn’t approved CBD for use as a marketed dietary supplement or food supply additive.

This means these 800 CVS locations will be sticking to “topicals” only, avoiding well-known food products like gummy bears, coffee, and honey. However, there is a strong possibility that we could see something like CVS CBD capsules in the near future.

Additionally, to avoid misrepresenting a largely untested compound as proven medicinal treatment, CVS will be solely marketing their CBD products as over-the-counter wellness alternatives.

What This Means

Though the hemp cultivation sector and CBD manufacturers scored a major win the 2018 Farm Bill, the FDA is in the process of developing guidelines for CBD products. Before you can expect to find CVS CBD gummies , some regulations must first be developed and implemented.

We will see some large-scale, federally sanctioned tests in the near future now that the largest pharmacy retailer in the country is helping fuel the rising popularity of CBD. With such a wide market and deep reach, if CVS’s products perform well, then I’m sure we can expect further retail expansion soon—perhaps nationally.

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