cbd oil used for parkinson& 39

Cbd oil used for parkinson& 39

New research reviews the evidence behind the benefits of drug microdosing and suggests that more "rigorous, placebo-controlled clinical studies" are necessary. The practice of microdosing — that is, taking small doses of.

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Despite evidence that some active substances in cannabis may support some aspects of health, many people who use this drug, and particularly those who smoke it, develop symptoms of dependence. A new.

20 Jul A walk in the park may actually have benefits

Spending time in nature brings many physical and mental health benefits, but a new study suggests that even just being able to see nature from your bedroom window could support your health.

20 Jul Chinese study seeks to show link between pollution and heart problems part 2

Studies have linked air pollution with the risk of developing a range of conditions, from neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's to diabetes and atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of.

19 Jul Bowel Cancer has been targeted for an alternate treatment

Chemotherapy treatment for people who have advanced bowel cancer and a particular genetic mutation is commonly ineffective. A combination of three different drugs could be the key to improved treatment. The outlook for.

Neuroimaging Studies of Acute Effects of THC and CBD in Humans and Animals: a Systematic Review

Background: In recent years, growing concerns about the effects of cannabis use on mental health have renewed interest in cannabis research. In particular, there has been a marked increase in the number of neuroimaging studies of the effects of cannabinoids. We conducted a systematic review to assess the impact of acute cannabis exposure on brain function in humans and in experimental animals.

Methods: Papers published until June 2012 were included from EMBASE, Medline, PubMed and LILACS databases following a comprehensive search strategy and pre-determined set of criteria for article selection. Only pharmacological challenge studies involving the acute experimental administration of cannabinoids in occasional or naïve cannabis users, and naïve animals were considered.

Results: Two hundred and twenty-four studies were identified, of which 45 met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies were in humans and 21 in animals. Most comprised studies of the acute effects of cannabinoids on brain functioning in the context of either resting state activity or activation during cognitive paradigms. In general, THC and CBD had opposite neurophysiological effects. There were also a smaller number of neurochemical imaging studies: overall, these did not support a central role for increased dopaminergic activity in THC-induced psychosis. There was a considerable degree of methodological heterogeneity in the imaging literature reviewed.

Conclusion: Functional neuroimaging studies have provided extensive evidence for the acute modulation of brain function by cannabinoids, but further studies are needed in order to understand the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Future studies should also consider the need for more standardised methodology and the replication of findings.

Current Pharmaceutical Design

Title:Neuroimaging Studies of Acute Effects of THC and CBD in Humans and Animals: a Systematic Review

Volume: 20 Issue: 13

Author(s): A. Batalla, J.A. Crippa, G.F. Busatto, F.S. Guimaraes, A.W. Zuardi, O. Valverde, Z. Atakan, P.K. McGuire, S. Bhattacharyya and R. Martín-Santos

  • Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clínic, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM; and Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.,Spain

Abstract: Background: In recent years, growing concerns about the effects of cannabis use on mental health have renewed interest in cannabis research. In particular, there has been a marked increase in the number of neuroimaging studies of the effects of cannabinoids. We conducted a systematic review to assess the impact of acute cannabis exposure on brain function in humans and in experimental animals.

Methods: Papers published until June 2012 were included from EMBASE, Medline, PubMed and LILACS databases following a comprehensive search strategy and pre-determined set of criteria for article selection. Only pharmacological challenge studies involving the acute experimental administration of cannabinoids in occasional or naïve cannabis users, and naïve animals were considered.

Results: Two hundred and twenty-four studies were identified, of which 45 met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies were in humans and 21 in animals. Most comprised studies of the acute effects of cannabinoids on brain functioning in the context of either resting state activity or activation during cognitive paradigms. In general, THC and CBD had opposite neurophysiological effects. There were also a smaller number of neurochemical imaging studies: overall, these did not support a central role for increased dopaminergic activity in THC-induced psychosis. There was a considerable degree of methodological heterogeneity in the imaging literature reviewed.

Conclusion: Functional neuroimaging studies have provided extensive evidence for the acute modulation of brain function by cannabinoids, but further studies are needed in order to understand the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Future studies should also consider the need for more standardised methodology and the replication of findings.