cbd oil with thc for my vape pen

Cannabis 101 – Making THC Oil

How to make your own THC liquid? This is a common question that lot of people ask. Doing your own vape juice is always fun and interesting.

Steps to Make Your Own THC Oil for Vaping

THC Oil can be super expensive and costly, but the benefits are so worth it.
Here is a guide on how to make THC Oil for your vape pleasure.

You Will Need:

1. 5-6 grams of high-quality bud
2. Cheese cloth
3. Two large mason jars
4. A large pot for boiling
5. Propylene Glycol
6. High Proof (190+) Grain Alcohol,
7. And a Pyrex bowl (or aluminum foil and a baking sheet). If you want exact measurements, pick up some blunt tip syringes. You will also want to be wearing rubber gloves throughout the process to protect your skin.

Make sure you don’t use rubbing alcohol! Try EverClear or Alcohol instead. You’ll also need a stove-top, of course, and as for your bud, you’ll want to make sure that it’s finely chopped before you begin.

1. Decarboxylate

– Place your finely chopped 5-6 grams of weed (or more if you’re so inclined) into the Pyrex bowl and bake it in the oven at 225-250 degrees F for about 15 minutes. (Alternatively, you can use aluminum foil and a baking sheet to heat up your bud like you would a batch of cookies. When you take them out, they’ll be dry and brownish.)

– The next step is to add the crispy weed to your mason jar, and then pour in the alcohol. (It should be enough to submerge the bud completely. If you want to be exact, use a syringe to add about 24 ML of High Proof Alcohol. You’ll probably want to open a window during this next part to keep your room ventilated and relatively free of vapors.)

– Add about 3.5-4 inches of water to your pot, and then place the mason jar directly inside the pot.
Boil the water to a low boil and stir the bud in the jar constantly. Here you’ll be trying to evaporate some of the excess alcohol. Continue to stir, watching the bud get darker. Once it’s dark, remove the pot from the stove and turn it off. Let it cool.

VERY USEFUL TOOL SET:

2. Strain

After you’ve evaporated some of the excess alcohol from your mixture, it’s time to use your cheese cloth or another item to filter out the plant fibers from your oil. – Cover your second mason jar with the cheesecloth and slowly pour in the mixture from the first mason jar, letting the cloth catch the buds. (It may be very thick and stuck to the bottom of the jar, so use a knife or fork to get it all out. Your bud should be wet and well-saturated.) – Squeeze the cheese cloth with the herb until every last drop is out, straining it into the second mason jar. (It should produce a nice brown liquid. If you are so inclined, let the cheesecloth drip over the second mason jar for an hour or two to get everything out.)

3. Process

– In your second mason jar, now filled with liquid and alcohol, add a bit of water and put the jar back inside the pot. (This time, you will want to boil your concoction until there are about 5 ML of liquid left in the jar. You can use your syringes to measure exactly and make sure you have the right amount.) – The final step is to add 20 MG of Propylene Glycol to your mason jar.
– Remove the jar from the pot.
– Using a syringe, extract the liquid from the jar and store it in your dropper bottles. (You should have about 25 ML of THC oil ready to use.)

DISCLAIMER
HoneyStick did not derive these facts, views, opinions contained within this article and does not promote, endorse, or validity its methods or claims. Please consult with experts before making any decisions regarding what was read herein.

Marijuana and Vaping: Shadowy Past, Dangerous Present

A technology initially promoted to help cigarette smokers has transformed marijuana use, too. Now, with cases of severe lung illness rising, health investigators are warning people to stop vaping cannabis.

SAN FRANCISCO — For years, a divisive debate has raged in the United States over the health consequences of nicotine e-cigarettes. During the same time, vaping of a more contentious substance has been swiftly growing, with scant notice from public health officials.

Millions of people now inhale marijuana not from joints or pipes filled with burning leaves but through sleek devices and cartridges filled with flavored cannabis oils. People in the legalized marijuana industry say vaping products now account for 30 percent or more of their business . Teenagers, millennials and baby boomers alike have been drawn to the technology — no ash, a faint smell, easy to hide — and the potentially dangerous consequences are only now becoming evident.

Most of the patients in the outbreak of severe lung illnesses linked to vaping — which has left 1,479 people sick and 33 dead so far — vaped THC, the ingredient in marijuana that makes people high. Until more information is known, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have warned people not to vape cannabis products.

To some scientists, and even industry leaders, warning signs have been apparent for years as vaping cannabis grew in the shadows, propelled by a patchwork of regulations, a wave of state-by-state legalization and a soaring supply of low-cost marijuana.

While the government and researchers poured resources into studying e-cigarettes, federal rules sharply limiting research into the health effects of cannabis — because it is classified as a controlled substance with a high potential for abuse — have left a void in scientific knowledge about what THC vaping does to the lungs.

Last year, Dr. Neal Benowitz, a professor of medicine and a researcher on nicotine and vaping at the University of California, San Francisco, sent a letter to Congress warning of the risks posed by leaving a hugely popular practice unstudied.

“Very little is known about the safety or effects of vaped cannabis oil,” he wrote, cautioning that some ingredients mixed into the oils “could have harmful, toxic effect on users, including the potential for causing and/or promoting cancer and lung disease.”

“It’s disgraceful,” Dr. Benowitz said in a recent interview as reports of hospitalizations and deaths from vaping-related lung illnesses mounted. “I’m not able to take products we think are potentially harmful and do analysis. I can buy a vape device around the corner, but I can’t bring it into the lab and test it.”

Even members of the legalized marijuana industry acknowledge the lack of hard science about the cannabis vaping products they sell.

“There’s a glaring gap in trying to understand this product,” said Jerred Kiloh , president of the board of the United Cannabis Business Association , which represents 165 marijuana dispensaries in California, where marijuana was legalized for recreational use in 2016.

Mr. Kiloh, who owns the Los Angeles dispensary Higher Path, said he believed that the vape pens sold in his stores and in other licensed and regulated stores are likely safe because the ingredients were measured and tested by the state . The Bureau of Cannabis Control did not return calls asking for comment.

Vaping oils typically include other additives, solvents and flavor enhancers, and health investigators believe some such ingredients, including vitamin E acetate, could be responsible for some of the lung illness cases. The problem of unknown and potentially dangerous additives, Mr. Kiloh and others said, is vastly worse in a soaring black market in the nearly 40 states where recreational marijuana is still illegal.

Even in states where the drug is legal, counterfeit cartridges are cheaper than the licensed, tested and taxed products. It is hard for legal players who pay taxes to compete. A regulated vape pen with half a gram of THC costs $55, compared with $25 or less on the street for an untested product.

“We don’t know what the chemical composition is,” Mr. Kiloh said, “and we especially don’t know what the chemical composition is once it’s been combined, heated and inhaled.”

No Ash, No Rolling Papers

In the earliest days of cannabis vaping, a small group of innovators saw the technology as a safer way to help medicinal marijuana patients. They hoped that vaping — which entails heating THC so that it turns to an aerosol — would be less harmful to the lungs than inhaling combusted marijuana.

But that ethos quickly gave way to a different lure: the pure convenience of vaping, which allowed users to avoid rolling joints, spilling ash, giving off a telltale smell — or getting caught. Vape pens brought the sheen of high technology to a drug associated with hippies and grunge, along with the discretion of, say, texting beneath the dinner table.

“You could vape in a police station and no one would even know, not that you’d want to do that ,” said a 35-year-old man outside Harvest, a marijuana dispensary in San Francisco, who declined to give his name because he said he did not want to hurt his job-hunting prospects.