How Do CBD Gummies Make You Feel

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How does CBD oil make you feel, and what do the different CBD compounds do to you? Get the lowdown on the different CBD oil products with Good Hemp.

How Does CBD Make You Feel?

So you’re trying Good Hemp Pure CBD oil for the first time. Welcome to the party! You might have heard about some of the benefits already, but how exactly will it change the way you feel and why?

CBD is a calming compound that is the perfect antidote to a highly active, anxiety-riddled lifestyle (hands up if you can relate ‍♀️). It helps you stay centred and grounded and makes you feel more relaxed as you go about your day. CBD is known for its calming properties, and on top of that, it can help with pain relief (like period pain or muscle pain), inflammation, and concentration.

There’s no disputing that the benefits of CBD are far reaching – the thing is that different types of CBD extracts produce different effects in the body based on their structural composition. To understand why this happens, we’ll need to distinguish between three types of CBD.

The Different Types of CBD

There are three common types of CBD extracts that you will find when searching for the right product for you: full spectrum, broad-spectrum and CBD isolate.

  • Full spectrum CBD contains a mixture of cannabinoids, sometimes including THC (the principal psychoactive component of cannabis plants), and terpenes
  • Broad-spectrum CBD also contains a combination of cannabinoids and terpenes, but it doesn’t contain THC
  • CBD isolate doesn’t contain cannabinoids or terpenes, and only includes pure CBD, as an isolated substance

Because of the key distinctions between each type, the way you feel will be different depending on which CBD extract you use.

What are cannabinoids?

Cannabinoids are the naturally occurring compounds found in the Cannabis Sativa plant – the most notable ones being THC and CBD. Cannabinoids interact with specific cannabinoid receptors in the central nervous system (mainly CB1 and CB2) and may have different effects based on the brain area involved. For example, interaction with the limbic system may alter your memory, cognition and psychomotor performance; interaction with the mesolimbic pathway may affect your reward and pleasure responses. Pain perception can also be altered by cannabinoids, which is why CBD oil is often used for pain relief.

What are terpenes?

Terpenes are fragrant oils found in many types of plants, including cannabis plants. Originally developed by cannabis plants to repel predators and lure pollinators, they are now often used to give distinctive flavours to CBD oil and cannabis varieties. The presence of different combinations of terpenes in CBD oil is thought to influence its effects, but more research is needed to understand exactly what each terpene brings to the table.

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The Effects of CBD vs THC

As full spectrum CBD extracts can include THC, it is possible that they induce a bit of a psychoactive “high”. Broad-spectrum and CBD isolate do not contain any THC, so they won’t have the same psychoactive effect.

That’s not to say that CBD oils that are THC-free don’t have mood-inducing properties: they *are* powerful mood altering compounds. Moderate doses can have a profound positive effect on your overall wellbeing through the way they induce feelings of grounding and calm, and counteract anxiety and stress.

Take CBD isolate (our speciality), for example. It provides a boost in natural alertness and some relaxing effects, but none of the high-inducing side effects that will stop you from going about your day like usual.

Tips for Using CBD For the First Time

Now that you know how you might feel depending on the different type of extract you use, the following tips will come in handy for when you use CBD for the first time.

  • Start on a lower dose and see how you feel
  • Up the dose gradually over time as you work towards hitting your own personal “sweet spot”
  • Do not exceed 70mg per day for FSA (and Good Hemp lab) approved safe use
  • Dispense the droplets under your tongue and leave them there for 60 seconds before swallowing – this helps the CBD to enter your bloodstream and get to work a little faster
  • Wait around 40 minutes for the effects to start kicking in

What Our Users Say

Our community is using Good Hemp CBD oil to help support a healthy lifestyle and bring balance back to their body and mind. See our drops in action and find out how CBD oil could help you!

CBD products are everywhere. But do they work?

By now, you’ve probably run into a product containing cannabidiol, also known as CBD. It’s in everything from drinks and pet products to lotions and chewable gummies. Even major drugstore chains have announced they will start carrying CBD products in certain states.

But many people still don’t really know what CBD is. Is it marijuana? Is it legal? Does it actually work? Is it safe?

The answers to those questions aren’t necessarily straight­forward. The only thing that is clear at this point: The marketing has gone way ahead of the science and the law when it comes to CBD products.

That said, CBD is thought to be a safe and effective option for certain conditions. Below, we sort through the confusion by answering some of the most common questions about CBD.

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Is CBD marijuana?

Yes and no. Cannabidiol is one of the two best-known active compounds derived from the marijuana plant. The other is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which is the substance that that produces the “high” from marijuana.

CBD does not get you high, but the idea that it’s not psychoactive is something of a misconception in his opinion. It does change your consciousness. You may feel mellow, experience less pain, and be more comfortable. In addition, some CBD products do contain small amounts of THC.

While CBD can come from marijuana, it can also be derived from hemp. Hemp is a related plant with 0.3% or less of THC. This plant is often used to make fabrics and ropes. As of 2018, Congress made hemp legal in all 50 states, and consequently CBD derived from hemp is also legal. The rules around marijuana-derived CBD, however, are far less clear.

Is marijuana-derived CBD legal?

Again, yes and no, depending on where you live. In some states marijuana is legal for both recreational use and medical use. In other states, it’s legal only for medical use. And in some areas, it’s not legal at all.

When it comes to CBD products, the FDA is still trying to get its arms around the issue. The agency is just starting the process of hashing out some rules regarding CBD sales. Officials recently formed a working group to create guidelines that could allow companies to legally market CBD products. Currently, CBD products are considered supplements, which aren’t FDA-regulated, and it is illegal for companies to make health or therapeutic claims about the products in their marketing. In announcing its effort to set CBD marketing rules, the FDA also signaled that it is cracking down on CBD companies that are using “egregious and unfounded claims” to market their products to “vulnerable populations.”

Currently, there is only one CBD product that has FDA approval: a prescription medication called Epidiolex, used to treat some rare severe seizure disorders in children. The bottom line is that in order to understand whether CBD is legal where you live, you’ll need to consult your state health department website or professionals in your community.

Does CBD work?

Yes, there is evidence that CBD works for some conditions, but certainly not all the conditions it is being promoted for these days. There’s no evidence, for example, that CBD cures cancer. There is moderate evidence that CBD can improve sleep disorders, fibromyalgia pain, muscle spasticity related to multiple sclerosis, and anxiety.

People report that oral CBD helps relieve anxiety and pain and also leads to better sleep. However, the same may not be true for a host of other CBD products on the market today, in particular those that are rubbed on the skin. It’s hard to know whether these have any clinical benefit, because they haven’t been tested sufficiently.

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Testing also shows that many products don’t contain what’s claimed on the label. For example, they may have less CBD than advertised. So, buyer beware.

Where should you purchase CBD products?

If you are interested in trying a CBD product, it’s best to seek one through a dispensary, which is an establishment legally licensed to sell marijuana, if they are available in your state. Dispensary products must be labeled so you can see exactly how much CBD is in the product and whether it also contains THC. A small amount of THC in a CBD product isn’t typically problematic. But larger amounts could cause a “high” and may present a risk if you are going to drive.

Also, keep in mind that CBD products aren’t standardized and will vary. It helps to keep a journal recording what type of CBD product you took, how much, and your response to it. This will help you track what works and what doesn’t for your condition.

Is CBD safe?

The safest way to take CBD is orally, as a tablet, chewable, or tincture (a concentrated liquid typically administered with a dropper). Steer clear of any illegally sold synthetic CBD products, sometimes called “spice” or “bath salts.” These products have induced psychotic reactions in some people and pose a major health risk.

For adults, CBD appears to be a very safe product. CBD does produce side effects for some people, including nausea, fatigue, and irritability. It may also interact with certain medications, so always check with your doctor before use.

But for children under age 21 it’s a different story. It’s also not clear if any amount of CBD is appropriate for children.

Evidence regarding CBD is still building. Now that some states have legalized recreational and medical use of marijuana products, including CBD, scientists are finding it easier to conduct research. More will be known in the next 5 to 10 years, including whether there are yet undiscovered problems associated with long-term use.

Image: Vanessa Numes/Getty Images

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As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review or update on all articles.

No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

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