how much of cbd oil pill for pain

Should You Take CBD for Pain?

People looking for a safer pain reliever are turning to cannabis-derived CBD. Michigan Medicine experts weigh in on what’s currently known about the trendy supplement.

Want to learn more on this topic? Listen to this podcast from the Rogel Cancer Center on Medical Marijuana for Cancer Patients.

CBD, short for cannabidiol, is undergoing a surge in popularity as the hot new supplement, with a promise to treat a variety of conditions including pain, anxiety, and insomnia, just to name a few. It’s also available in all manner of forms, from lotions and oils to CBD-infused food and drink. But does it work?

CBD is one of the compounds in the cannabis plant, better known as marijuana. Unlike the famous cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD doesn’t cause the psychological effects typical of being “high”. Both CBD and THC act on the body’s natural endocannabinoid system, which plays a role in many processes including appetite, pain and memory.

The scientific evidence around CBD use is thin, a fact that is mainly due to politics. “Cannabis has been a Schedule 1 drug for a long time, which has limited the type of research needed to figure out how best to use it therapeutically,” says Kevin Boehnke, Ph.D., research investigator in the department of anesthesiology and the Michigan Medicine Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center. Under the U.S. Federal Controlled Substances Act, Schedule 1 drugs are defined as having no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.

Yet marijuana has been used as a medicinal plant for thousands of years, he notes. In fact, one of the first recorded uses of cannabis was for rheumatism, also known as arthritis. Cannabis products were widely used as medicines in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and were listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia before the onset of Federal restriction in 1937 under the Marijuana Tax Act.

Much of the research literature around CBD in particular supports its use as a treatment for childhood epilepsy. Indeed, in 2018 the FDA approved the CBD-based drug Epidiolex as a drug for childhood epileptic conditions. In a substantial policy shift, Epidiolex was designated as Schedule V, which is the least restrictive drug schedule and indicates little potential for abuse.

While there aren’t any published clinical trials on CBD in pain, Boehnke notes that ongoing preclinical studies in animals have demonstrated that CBD reduces pain and inflammation, and studies of CBD in humans show that it is well-tolerated and has few negative side effects. “There are also observational studies that ask why people use CBD and if it’s effective, and results tend to be quite positive. People report using CBD for anxiety, pain, sleep — all things that go hand-in-hand with chronic pain,” he says. The passage of the 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp-derived CBD (<0.3% THC) from the Controlled Substances Act, and many people are since testing it out. Boehnke says, “Even though there isn’t clinical trial literature for most common uses of CBD, people don’t necessarily follow what clinical trials say.”

So many people are turning to CBD as an alternative pain reliever, especially in light of the opioid crisis, that in a commentary published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Boehnke and Daniel Clauw, M.D., director of the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center, provided advice for clinicians on how to counsel their patients about CBD and cannabis use.

LISTEN UP: Add the new Michigan Medicine News Break to your Alexa-enabled device, or subscribe to our daily updates on iTunes , Google Play and Stitcher .

They also provided guidance for the Arthritis Foundation, who recently surveyed 2,600 people with arthritis and found that 29% currently use CBD to treat arthritis symptoms.

Boehnke and Clauw recommend that people with chronic pain talk to their doctor about adding CBD to their treatment plan, and continue to use their prescribed medication. They offer the following advice for people wanting to try CBD:

Don’t smoke or vape. Bottom line is smoking anything harms the lungs. Vaping has been associated with a recent epidemic of lung disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

Purchase from reputable sources. Like vitamins and other supplements, CBD products aren’t regulated or FDA approved to treat disease, so buyer beware. Look for products that have been tested by an independent third party lab “so you don’t end up with a product that has THC in it or a product contaminated with heavy metals or pesticides,” says Boehnke.

Route of administration matters. CBD is best taken in pill or capsule form for slow extended release or as an oral tincture (infused oil that contains CBD) for faster effect onset.

Start low, go slow. Take a small amount and slowly increase your dosage until you start to get symptom relief over a matter of weeks. Track your symptoms to get a sense of whether or not CBD is a helpful part of your treatment plan.

Check your state laws. While medical marijuana is legal in many states, it’s still illegal at the Federal level, putting CBD in a legal gray zone in many areas.

The Empowered Pain Patient’s Guide to CBD

Tell me all I need to know about using cannabidiol for chronic pain.

What can CBD (aka: cannabidiol) do for your chronic pain? This natural compound extracted from the Cannabis sativa plant will not get you high, since it does not produce the same psychotropic effects as its cannabinoid sibling, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but many people are finding that it can complement their pain care plan. In fact, research shows that of the 62% of people who use CBD for a medical condition, the majority are treating chronic pain, arthritis, and joint pain, as well as anxiety. 1

What’s more, CBD has minimal side effects and a low-risk, zero-addiction profile. But before you pop a gummy or ingest an oil, you’ll want to read on.

SO, WHAT IS CBD EXACTLY?

Yes, cannabidiol (CBD) does come from marijuana. But let’s say it again and louder for the people in the back: No, it does not get you high! In the United States, legal CBD products are predominantly derived from the hemp plant, which is a species of the sativa marijuana plant. A key difference is that hemp contains 0.3% or less of THC cannabinoids.

CBD is legal – at the federal level (kind of), and in most but not all states (more on this later).

When we talk about CBD, we are typically talking about CBD products, such as topical creams and ingestible oils that are created by extracting the CBD compound from the marijuana plant. Although, some CBD products do contain small amounts of THC – which we will get to.

CBD has been shown to be:

  • anti-inflammatory, meaning it has potential to reduce joint pain associated with arthritis
  • anti-oxidative, so it may reduce systematic inflammation by fighting oxidative stress and decrease symptoms of autoimmune conditions like lupus
  • anti-emetic, meaning it can decrease vomiting and nausea associated with cancer treatments
  • anti-psychotic, so it can ease symptoms of anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • neuroprotective, meaning it may help to slow the progression of neurological disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). 2

Specific conditions that may be helped by CBD include:

  • Anxiety
  • Cancer
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Neuropathic Pain
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Seizures
  • Systematic inflammation

CBD is a cannabinoid found in marijuana plants that has many beneficial effects, without the psychotropic effects of its cannabinoid counterpart, THC. (Image: iStock)

BUT WAIT, CBD GETS COMPLICATED: HERE’s HOW IT DIFFERS FROM MEDICAL MARIJUANA AND HEMP

Is CBD Actually Marijuana or Hemp, or Both?

Let’s break it down:

  • CBD is a cannabinoid found in marijuana plants that has many beneficial effects, without the psychotropic effects of its cannabinoid counterpart, THC.
  • CBD can be derived from various varieties of the marijuana plant including both sativa and indica.
  • Hemp is a species of the sativa marijuana varietal plant and has some unique features:

– Won’t get you high
– Contains 0.3% or less THC
– Has limited chemical compounds
– Is used to makes clothes and textiles
– Is legally sold in many stores and online

  • CBD derived from hemp is legal at the federal level. CBD derived from non-hemp marijuana is not legal at the federal level but is legal in certain states.
  • CBD derived from hemp may lack certain compounds that some research suggests aids in medicinal benefits, something referred to as the entourage effect (we’ll dive into this shortly).

Just How Legal is CBD?

The 2018 US Farm Bill legalized the growing of hemp and sale of hemp-derived products, which made CBD legal at the federal level (mostly). As noted, hemp is a species of the marijuana plant with one very important distinction: the variety must have less than 0.3% THC. So, if the CBD you buy comes from a hemp plant with less than 0.3% CBD and is grown in accordance with the 2018 Farm Bill regulations, and you live in a state where CBD is legal, you are in full abidance of the law.

The CBD compound itself is still classified as Schedule I drug (along with LSD and heroin). Federally, CBD derived from non-hemp marijuana is illegal. If you live in a state that has legalized marijuana, you can find non-hemp derived CBD products at a medical marijuana dispensary.

What about all those CBD products you’re seeing in line at the supermarket, the local health food store, and online? The market for CBD has basically exploded in the past few years but is completely unregulated. The CBD you buy may come from hemp or may not. It may contain the amount of CBD it claims or may not. It also may contain more THC than it claims. Welcome to the budding world (pun intended) of medicinal CBD.

Here’s the bottom line: CBD products that come from the hemp plant (meaning the THC level does not go above 0.3%) are legal across the country. CBD products that come from non-hemp marijuana (meaning the THC levels may go above 0.3%) may be legal depending on the state you live in but are not legal at the federal level. 3

THE SCIENCE BEHIND CBD: HOW IT WORKS FOR PAIN AND PAIN-RELATED SYMPTOMS

Your Natural Endocannabinoid System Supports CBD

Our body’s endocannabinoid system is composed of three main components:

  1. Cannabinoid receptors, namely CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are predominantly found in the central nervous system (CNS, the nerves attached along the spinal cord and around the brain) and are largely responsible for the cognitive and emotional effects of marijuana, as well as our perception of pain. CB2 receptors are more common in our peripheral nervous system (PNS, the outer nerves beyond the spinal cord and brain such as those in your arms and legs, although these receptors may also be found in our CNS) and in your immune cells.
  2. Endogenous cannabinoids (the cannabinoids that your body produces)
  3. Enzymes that facilitate the breakdown and use of cannabinoids

Our natural endocannabinoids function on demand, meaning that when our body senses inflammation, or needs to return to homeostasis (a state of stable balance) it will release endocannabinoids that bind to cannabinoid receptors.

CBD itself does not bind to receptors but is thought to work by inducing other components of the cannabinoid system.

In fact, CBD exerts a wide array of effects on the body’s central and peripheral nervous systems, as well as the immune system. It works in conjunction with our endocannabinoid system to function in an antioxidant capacity, to decrease inflammation, and to act as an analgesic or pain reliever. CBD may even slow the progression of osteoarthritis and prevent nerve damage, according to early model studies. 4

Your Body Chemistry Matters

Because of the way the endocannabinoid system works, the bioavailability of CBD is an important factor in how you will respond. Bioavailability is the amount of a substance that successfully makes it into the bloodstream and has an effect. Think about how some medications require you to take them with food or water, or on an empty stomach. Well, the amount of CBD that you actually absorb when taking a CBD product works the same way and will depend on:

  • The form you take: For example, CBD edibles may be better absorbed when taken with food, especially fatty foods. See all the types of CBD products listed below.
  • Your weight and marijuana history: Like any medication or supplement, you may want to take CBD according to your weight. However, two people of the same gender and weight may respond very differently to the same dosage due to factors such as metabolism, body composition, and history of using marijuana products. A good rule of thumb is to begin with a small dose such as 2 mg and increase by 2 to 5 mg after a period of weeks. The product you choose will also matter. For example, edibles take a longer time for your body to process and you may not feel their effects for hours. In the case of edibles, it is best to choose 1 dose per attempt, and not take more unless you do not feel the effects after 3 to 4 full hours.
  • Your habits: Whether you’ve eaten, slept, or are stressed can all affect how your body responds to taking CBD.

CBD’s Potential Benefits

Importantly, CBD is hydrophobic and lipophilic, meaning it will dissolve in fats. The dissolution helps it to be carried across the blood-brain barrier and affect your CNS, where it can have a broad range of positive effects on pain including:

  • Reducing Pain Signals – CBD modulates pain and the sensation of pain by stimulating the reuptake of the neurotransmitter, adenosine, thereby boosting adenosine levels in the brain and inhibiting pain sensations. CBD may also block pain signals from reaching processing centers in the brain by binding to TPRV1, which is responsible for pain and inflammation. 5-7
  • Increasing Immune Response – CBD can modulate the immune response by decreasing levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibits the proliferation of T cells that are indicated in autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorders. 8
  • Reducing Inflammation – CBD decreases oxidative stress and systemic inflammation by acting as an antioxidant. CBD may also decrease inflammation by preventing a reductions in micro elements like zinc and selenium, which are important actors for a balanced immune response, and may reduce neuropathic pain (such as fibromyalgia or neuropathic back pain) by countering hyperalgesia (an abnormally heightened pain response).
  • Improving Mood and Sleep – Chronic pain can disrupt your daily life, relationships, work, and mental health. If you are facing anxiety, depression, insomnia, and fatigue – all common with chronic pain – CBD may help you relax or get the restful sleep you need. Note, however, that many studies that relate CBD to improved sleep focus on full spectrum CBD (described below) and it is thought that the entourage effect of THC (along with terpenes and other cannabinoids) is mainly responsible for aiding in sleep. 9

CBD is thought to be helpful in easing the symptoms of the following conditions

Given these benefits, CBD is thought to be helpful in easing the symptoms of the following conditions:

  • Osteoarthritis – this painful joint condition has been examined quite a bit in relation to CBD. Some early studies show that CBD acts as an antagonist and blocks or debilitates the GPR55 receptor, which may slow osteoarthritis by facilitating bone reabsorption. 4
  • Type 2 Diabetes – CBD may activate a receptor called, PPAR-gamma, which may increase insulin sensitivity, an important step in improving type 2 diabetes, and decreasing the risk for developing diabetes-related neuropathic pain. 10
  • Cancer and Alzheimer’s – CBD may exert an anti-cancer effect via the debilitation of GPR55 receptors in the body and by the activation of the PPAR-gamma receptor, which also degrades amyloid-beta plaque, a key molecule linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. 10
  • Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis – CBD continues to be studied for these inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, as well as for fibromyalgia. Here’s more on cannabinoids and lupus.
  • Multiple Sclerosis – there are mixed data for the use of CBD (as well as THC) in helping to reduce MS-related pain and spasticity. 2
  • Anxiety – as noted, anxiety related to living with chronic pain, or that exists on its own, may be eased with CBD use, whether temporarily or in the long-term.

Keep in mind that while CBD can have many benefits, it is not a cure-all and should not be viewed as an alternative to your other pain care treatments. Rather, CBD should be considered a complementary treatment to add to your pain management toolbox.

HOW TO USE CBD FOR PAIN: WHICH PRODUCTS TO TRY

The (i)llegality surrounding CBD and medicinal marijuana (which are a whole other category, described in our medical marijuana for pain guide) can make choosing and using the right product confusing. Here is what you may find when you start searching the marketplace.

Get to Know the CBD Isolate, Broad, and Full Spectrum Products

Scientists are still discovering the different ways in which CBD may help to fight disease and reduce pain and its related symptoms. They are also still working to understand the functionality of CBD as an isolated compound versus a whole plant. For example, you may come across product descriptions such as CBD isolate, Full Spectrum CBD, and Broad Spectrum CBD.

Here’s a quick cheat sheet but note that efficacy of each is still up for debate.

A CBD isolate refers to a product that is composed of the CBD compound only and is extracted from the marijuana plant. CBD isolates can be extracted from both hemp and non-hemp species of marijuana. Remember, for it to be federally legal, it must come from the hemp species. In states where medicinal marijuana is legal, you can find CBD isolates in a marijuana dispensary. Additionally, certain CBD isolates are synthetic forms, such as those used in the pharmaceuticals Marinol and Syndros – both FDA approved to relieve chemotherapy-induced nausea and to improve appetite in people with AIDS. 3

Full Spectrum CBD products maintain the full profile of the marijuana plant and in addition to CBD, contain a variety of other cannabinoids including: THC, CBDa, CBG, and CBN, as well as terpenes and other compounds such as flavonoids, proteins, phenols, sterols, and esters. Technically, full spectrum products can contain 0.3% or less THC, if they are derived from the hemp species, however, full spectrum CBD products derived from non-hemp marijuana tend to have a wider cannabinoid and terpene profile.

Broad Spectrum cannabis products maintain the whole profile of the marijuana plant, but with the THC mostly removed.

Be Aware of the Entourage Effect

Proponents of full spectrum cannabis products refer to something called the entourage effect, which basically means that the compounds in marijuana work synergistically or cooperatively. 11 Think of marijuana like a plant (which it is). Just like vitamin supplements don’t offer the same benefits as consuming whole foods, CBD isolates may not offer the same benefits as whole-plant extracts. 12

But it’s not that simple. CBD has been shown to decrease the psychotropic effects of THC, meaning that if a full spectrum extract has a greater ratio of THC to CBD, you won’t necessarily feel so high. Of course, everyone responds differently to marijuana and this will involve a lot of trial and error.

Although CBD is generally well tolerated, THC may decrease potential side effects of CBD. THC may also play an important role in CBD’s pain-relieving effects, by aiding its influence on the endocannabinoid system.

The entourage effect also accounts for the terpenes 13 that can differ between various strains of marijuana and contribute to the plant’s effect. Some recent research points to the beneficial effects of this compound (think aromatherapy).

To top it off, the entourage effect may further offer benefits that a CBD isolate doesn’t, but CBD isolates can still offer many medicinal benefits, especially when applied topically for pain conditions.

Clear? You likely still have questions. Read on for specific products and which symptoms they aid.

Choose a CBD Product that Fits Your Needs

Selecting a CBD product depends on:

  • The pain you are experiencing
  • The effect you are seeking, such as how quickly it will take effect after you use/apply the CBD, and how long that effect lasts
  • Personal preference for administration

A budtender – that’s what they call dispensary pharmacists – or your doctor can guide you, but here’s a quick overview.

Topicals include CBD creams, lotions, salves, and ointments. These are usually best to treat localized pain, arthritic pain, and neuropathic or nerve pain. 14 Applied directly to the skin, one advantage of topicals is that they do not seem to exert any psychotropic effects. Studies have shown potential benefit of topicals in the treatment of arthritic pain in particular.

Ingesting CBD can be more beneficial for people with systemic inflammatory conditions (such as rheumatoid arthritis or Multiple Sclerosis [MS]), autoimmune conditions, and full body pain, caused by neurological conditions such as fibromyalgia or cancer pain.

Because CBD dissolves in fats, it’s a good idea to choose products that have healthy oils, to increase absorption rates.

Oral ingestions come in many forms such as:

  • CBD isolate oral sprays that are taken under the tongue and rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With oral sprays and tinctures, it is generally easier to control the dose.
  • Capsules are essentially a pill form of CBD. You might want to take them with a snack high in healthy fats to increase the bioavailability of the CBD.
  • Oils come in a variety of products and are typically a combination of CBD extract and a plant-based oil. You can take these directly under the tongue or add them to food products.
  • Edibles are oral products that you consume like any food product – think CBD brownies, gummies, and snacks. While the passage of CBD edibles through the digestive tract makes the effect more difficult to predict, it may have specific immunosuppressive benefits for people with MS and other autoimmune conditions. This effect is likely due to the interaction of CBD with the plethora of immune cells in our intestinal lymphatic system. 15

Vaping has become a popular form of taking CBD. Unlike rolling a joint, vaping involves a CBD oil cartridge that is inserted into a vaping pen. While some may assume that vaping is safer than smoking, there are dangers associated with both practices regarding lung health.

You can vape a full spectrum CBD, which may get you a bit high, even when using a strain with trace amounts of THC.

You can also vape a CBD isolate or broad spectrum oil, which should not induce a high.

How to Buy a CBD Product

First, consider the source. Studies show that continuous CBD consumption is generally safe and can have many benefits. However, because of CBD’s complicated status, the compound itself may still be classified as an illegal substance. See the FDA’s FAQs on cannabis regulations (#9).

How do you know you are getting the CBD the package claims? You don’t, but there are a few ways to put the odds in your favor.

  • Buy direct from the manufacturer, either online or in the store.
  • Look for brands based in early legalization states, such as Colorado, Washington, and Oregon.
  • Look for organic sourcing (theUS Dept of Agriculture can certify CBD products as organic. Additionally, some clinicians recommend that patients utilize CBD products imported from Europe, which actually has even more stringent requirements for low THC levels (< 0.2%) as well as a more established regulatory system for hemp.)

These tips and tricks may help ensure your CBD is the real deal, but they still don’t provide proof. The best way to be sure you are consuming what you want is to request third party testing. Some products will print a QR code on the packaging that links directly to their proof of third-party testing. You can also do your own third-party testing by bringing your CBD sample to a testing lab, although this may get a bit tedious (the USDA provides a searchable hemp testing laboratory list).

These days, it seems like you can purchase CBD just about anywhere, but if it’s an option, you may want to visit a medical marijuana dispensary. Buying CDB from a medical dispensary doesn’t guarantee the product’s quality but it’s a good place to start. Before you go:

  1. Make a specific list of your pain symptoms and if possible, share the source of the pain (eg, an injury, a specific condition).
  2. Have an idea of how much THC you want in your product. Remember the ratio of THC to CBD has a lot to do with how much of a high the product will give you. It will also help determine how the product functions (our medical marijuana guide reviews CBD:THC ratios).
  3. Understand that CBD use requires a lot of touch and go to find benefit. You may want to buy smaller amounts of different varieties first and keep a journal on how much you took, what type, and how it affected you so that you can share that information with the dispensary budtender next time.
  4. Educate yourself on different products and strains (Green Leaf provides some examples of strains.)

WHAT ELSE TO EXPECT WHEN TAKING CBD

OK, so we know that taking it won’t get you high, but taking enough (often based on your weight), can have a calming effect. And the side effects are minimal, with some people experiencing drowsiness, nausea, or tiredness. It is unlikely to negatively impact your mood or cognitive ability, making it a seemingly safer and preferred product for many.

But it is important to be cautious if you are taking other medications or substances, like alcohol. Specifically:

  • Be cautious of using CBD if you are taking medications that thin the blood (eg, heparin, warfarin, ibuprofen) as CBD can ramp up the blood-thinning effect.
  • CBD can increase the depressant effects of alcohol when taken in conjunction so it may not be wise to take them together.

Remember that CBD use for pain and related symptoms is not an exact science, so you may need to try more than one brand and method before feeling relief. The good news is that, to date, CBD is not considered to be physically addictive, and there’s no history of anyone overdosing on it, so a little trial and error likely won’t hurt as long as you are sourcing safely.

HAVING THOSE HARD CONVERSATIONS ABOUT CBD USE

CBD is not marijuana ­­– even though it can be derived from the marijuana plant. Still, some CBD products contain THC, and for some people these products may work better (remember the entourage effect). The stigma surrounding marijuana-derived treatments can be difficult for people who benefit from their medicinal effects. Having honest conversations with family members (including how to talk to your kids about CBD and medical marijuana use) about the science and history of medicinal cannabis use is often a good place to start.

WHAT CAN I DO RIGHT NOW?

  1. Find out what your state has legalized. The CBD Awareness Project lists state-by-state laws and initiatives while the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) lists regulations. You can also try Leafly’s search engine
  2. Think about the type of CBD you may wish to try – a topical, an oil, edibles, etc. Start small and go slow.
  3. Look into a local dispensary and schedule an appointment with your doctor to talk about which CBD product may work for your specific symptoms.

Overall, the risks of taking CBD are very low, and the rewards can be quite promising. Still, it’s important to remember that more research is needed to understand the full effects of CBD. Your treatment is a personal choice and for many, a personal journey.

How does CBD help pain?

CBD may help to reduce pain by acting on a variety of biological processes in the body. CBD has been shown to work as an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and analgesic. CBD may also reduce the anxiety that people living with chronic pain often experience.

What is the best CBD oil for pain?

There is no one best CBD oil for pain. The type will depend on your pain condition, how you consume the CBD, and your body chemistry. An important consideration will be whether the oil is a CBD isolate, a full spectrum extract, or a broad spectrum extract. It is also important to know you are buying a trustworthy product, especially because the CBD market is not regulated.

How long does it take for CBD oil to work for joint pain?

That depends on how you take your CBD oil. The most predictable consumption method is sublingual (under the tongue) using a spray or tincture. According to the American Arthritis Foundation, 16 effects are usually felt within 15 to 45 minutes.

How many milligrams (mg) of CBD work for pain?

The dosage of CBD that works for your pain will depend on the amount/percentage of CBD in the product, how you take it (whether by mouth, inhalation, or topical application) and your body weight and chemistry (several websites offer CBD calculators to determine a starting dose). The best thing is to speak with your doctor or a budtender (essentially a dispensary pharmacist) before choosing a CBD dosage. If your doctor does not recommend a dose, it is best to start small and gradually increase the dose from there until you achieve the desired effect.

1. Corroon J, Phillips JA. A cross-sectional study of cannabidiol users. Cannabis Cannabinoid Res. 2018;3(1):152-161.

2. Rudroff T, Sosnoff J. Cannabidiol to improve mobility in people with multiple sclerosis. Front Neurol. 2018;9:183.

3. FDA. FDA Regulation of Cannabis and Cannabis-Derived Products, Including Cannabidiol (CBD). Updated August 3, 2020. Available at: www.fda.gov/news-events/public-health-focus/fda-regulation-cannabis-and-cannabis-derived-products-including-cannabidiol-cbd.

4. Philpott HT, et al. Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis. Pain. 2017 Dec; 158(12): 2442–2451.

5. Yamaoka G, et al. Different analgesic effects of adenosine between postoperative and neuropathic pain. J Orthop Sci. 2013;18(1):130-136.

6. De Petrocellis L, et al. Effects of cannabinoids and cannabinoid-enriched Cannabis extracts on TRP channels and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes. Br J Pharmacol. 2011;163(7):1479-1494.

7. De Gregorio D, McLaughlin R, Posa L, et al.Cannabidiol modulates serotonergic transmission and reverses both allodynia and anxiety-like behavior in a model of neuropathic pain. Pain. 2019;160(1):136-150.

8. Atalay S, Jarocka-Karpowicz I, Skrzydlewska E. Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Cannabidiol. Antioxidants. 2020;9(1):21.

9. Nicholson AN, Turner C, et al. Effect of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on nocturnal sleep and early-morning behavior in young adults. J Clin Pshychopharmacol. 2004;23(3):305-313.

10. O’Sullivan SE. An update on PPAR activation by cannabinoids. Br J Pharmacol. 2016;173(12):1899–1910.

11. Russo, E. Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. Br J Pharmacol. 2011;163(7):1344-1364.

12. Supplements: Nutrition in a pill. Mayo Clinic. 2017. Available at: www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/supplements/art-20044894. Accessed July 2020.

13. Nuutinen T. Medicinal properties of terpenes found in Cannabis sativa and Humulus lupulus. Eur J Med Chem. 2018;157(5):198-228.

14. Bruni N, Della Pepa C, Oliaro-Bosso S, et al. Cannabinoid delivery systems for pain and inflammation treatment. Molecules. 2018;23(10):2478.

15. Zgair A, Lee J, Wong J, et al. Oral administration of cannabis with lipids leads to high levels of cannabinoids in the intestinal lymphatic system and prominent immunomodulation. Sci Rep. 2017;7:14542.

Best CBD Pills for Pain Relief: Choosing The Right Hemp Capsules for Inflammation

CBD is taking the world of medicine and health supplements by the storm. Some users swear by it, claiming CBD helped them shake the traditional treatments off.

CBD’s pain-killing and anti-inflammatory properties are backed by scientific studies; the cannabinoid comes in many forms, including oils, gummies, vapes, topicals, and capsules.

Speaking of CBD capsules, this is probably the most common form of all supplements. They are convenient, easy to take, and come with a premeasured dose of CBD in each serving.

CBD capsules can help you ease pain and inflammation, but there are too many poorly manufactured pills offered on the market. Since the hemp industry remains unregulated, customers need to take responsibility in their own hands — researching the brands they’re looking to purchase CBD from, such as CBD pills for pain.

If you’re in a rush and don’t have the time to do the legwork, we’ve already done the hard work for you, evaluating 10 reputable brands that offer premium CBD pills for pain and other health conditions.

We’ll also explain the mechanism of action behind CBD’s analgesic effects.

Best CBD Pills for Pain and Inflammation: Top 10 Brands in 2022

  1. Royal CBD – Best CBD Pills for Pain Overall
  2. Gold Bee – Best Organic CBD Pills for Pain Relief
  3. Green Roads – Runner Up
  4. Hemp Bombs – Best Pure CBD
  5. CBDfx – Best Variety
  6. cbdMD – Good Value
  7. Charlotte’s Web – Most Popular Brand
  8. PlusCBD Capsules – Largest Size
  9. Medterra – Best for Daytime Use
  10. Joy Organics – Best Customer Service

1. Royal CBD

Royal CBD capsules are made with organic ingredients, including hemp extract, MCT oil, and a vegan softgel shell. They contain full-spectrum CBD, so you’re getting the whole range of supportive cannabinoids and terpenes aside from the CBD. They’re available in one potency — 25 mg — making it an ideal choice for experienced consumers or those who weigh more than an average user.

The 25 mg potency is also a decent option for pain management, as it can address more serious symptoms and are more cost-effective in the long run. On the other hand, we’d love to see a 10 mg version from the company; it would be a nice nod towards beginner users.

In our recent review for Royal CBD, all of their products are tested for potency and purity in a third-party laboratory to ensure the top quality and transparency standards.

Pros:

  • Organic hemp
  • CO2 extraction
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • 25 mg of CBD per capsule
  • Vegan
  • Gluten-free
  • Third-party tested for quality and safety

Cons:

  • Only one potency option is available

2. Gold Bee

Gold Bee is a Nevada-based company founded by cannabis aficionados and superfood specialists. Similar to Royal CBD, the Gold Bee brand specializes in organic products that are crafted to high-quality standards.

The Gold Bee CBD capsules are made with the same full-spectrum extracts as the company’s oils. They also contain the same dose per serving — 40 mg — so that users can reap the same benefits in an easy-to-carry product. You can take them even if you’re vegan because they’re made without gelatin. Aside from relieving pain, these CBD-infused capsules also serve as a sleep aid for many people who suffer from insomnia and sleep deprivation.

These capsules are a great pick for those who are looking for a strong daily dose of CBD due to the high severity of pain or higher body weight.

Pros:

  • Organic hemp
  • CO2 extraction
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • Very strong: 40 mg of CBD per capsule
  • Vegan
  • Created by superfood specialists
  • Third-party tested for quality and safety

Cons:

  • No low-strength capsules

3. Green Roads

Green Roads is one of the largest private-owned CBD brands in North America according to the Brightfield Research Group Report. They stock a wide range of pharmaceutical-grade CBD supplements, such as oils, gummies, topicals, capsules, and even pet products.

The Green Roads CBD capsules are available in three options:

  • Regular: 25 mg of full-spectrum CBD
  • Relax : 25 mg of CBD + GABA + 5-HTP
  • Sleep: 25 mg of CBD + Melatonin

Although there are no low-potency or extra-strength capsules, it’s good to see a company that tries to address different health needs with its unique formulations. Full-spectrum CBD leverages the entourage effect, and with the help of those extra ingredients, this mechanism is even more pronounced.

Pros:

  • US-grown hemp
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • 25 mg per capsule
  • Suited for different health needs

Cons:

  • Limited potency options
  • The “Sleep” version contains too much melatonin per capsule in our opinion
  • More expensive (per mg of CBD) than competitors

4. Hemp Bombs

Hemp Bombs is a true maverick in the CBD space. The company combines high-quality ingredients with smart marketing, which made them one of the most popular CBD brands in the USA.

The company sells a wide range of CBD capsules. They are available in different sizes, from 8-count to 100-count bottles. You can choose from two strength options — 15 mg and 30 mg — and there’s also a “sleep” option with melatonin.

These are pure CBD capsules, meaning they only contain CBD isolate. Unlike most companies that we’ve reviewed for the best CBD pills for pain, these products don’t evoke the entourage effect, so their dose may not be as effective as the one from full-spectrum capsules.

Pros:

  • Organic hemp
  • Two strengths are available: 15 and 30 mg
  • THC-free
  • Vegan
  • You can buy them in several size options (including sample packs)

Cons:

  • The hemp is imported from Europe
  • No high-strength capsules are available
  • No entourage effect due to the lack of the other hemp compounds

5. CBDfx

CBDfx has several options for its CBD pills for pain. They are sold in 30-count or 60-count bottles, offering 25 mg or 50 mg of CBD per capsule depending on the selected strength. A great thing about this product is that it has been created by pharmacists and reviewed by doctors to ensure that the formulation is safe and effective.

The capsules contain full-spectrum CBD, so similar to other companies in our ranking for the best CBD pills for pain, you’re getting more bang out of your buck, especially with the high-strength version if you’re looking to address severe discomfort. To increase the bioavailability of its pills, CBDfx has suspended them in MCT oil, which is the most effective carrier for cannabinoids.

That being said, there’s little information about the brand on the website. This can make it difficult for hesitant customers to build a relationship with CBDfx, as trust is of paramount importance in this unregulated industry.

Pros:

  • Full-spectrum
  • 25 mg or 50 mg of CBD per capsule
  • Vegan
  • Third-party tested for quality and safety

Cons:

  • No low-strength capsules
  • Little information about the company
  • No formulas that would address specific health needs

6. cbdMD

cbdMD offers softgel CBD capsules made from non-GMO, organic, US-grown hemp. These capsules are made with a full-spectrum CBD extract, which is the most desired format among people who use CBD pills for pain. The company is highly transparent, providing batch-specific certificates of analysis on its website.

The cbdMD capsules contain 15, 30, or 50 mg of CBD depending on the selected strength. You can also buy them in larger containers, with up to 100 capsules per bottle. The company claims that it has enriched its capsules with CBG, CBN, and beneficial terpenes, although they don’t specify which terpenes have been used in the formula.

Another problem with this company is that the strengths they use are less obvious than most of the CBD pills for pain we’ve mentioned here. People usually go with doses like 10, 25, or 40 mg per capsule. But, on the other hand, it’s a good alternative if you don’t take standard doses yet still don’t want to switch to CBD oil.

Pros:

  • Organic, US-grown hemp
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • Enriched with CBG and CBN
  • 3 strength options
  • Third-party tested for quality and safety

Cons:

  • Priced at the higher end
  • FedEx is the only shipping option

7. Charlotte’s Web

Charlotte’s Web was founded by Stanley Brothers who have popularized CBD in the mainstream media by helping now late Charlotte Figi with her rare form of epilepsy that was resistant to conventional treatments. Since then, the company has become a true powerhouse, offering a broad range of CBD supplements.

The Charlotte’s Web capsules are made with a full-spectrum CBD extract, carrying 15 mg or 25 mg per capsule, depending on the selected potency. You can also choose between 3 bottle sizes: 30ct, 60ct, and 90ct, which is a nice nod towards people who like to buy CBD pills for pain in larger quantities.

However, there are no high-strength options in the company’s collection. Charlotte’s Web also doesn’t have any formulations designed to address unique health goals.

Pros:

  • One of the most popular brands in the world
  • Organic hemp
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • 15 or 25 mg of CBD per capsule
  • 3 bottle sizes
  • Vegan

Cons:

  • No high-strength capsules
  • No formulas that would address specific health needs
  • The company has received a few warning letters from the FDA regarding health claims

8. PlusCBD Capsules

PlusCBD capsules are all about simplicity. This product is formulated with a whole-plant CBD extract that contains all beneficial compounds found in hemp. This includes adjunctive cannabinoids, terpenes, and trace amounts of THC. Each capsule contains a low dose of 10 mg CBD, making it a great choice for those who have never tried CBD in their life.

Unfortunately, the product uses olive oil instead of MCT oil as a carrier, meaning that you may not get the most out of its bioavailability. On top of that, the formula includes carrageenan, which is a known carcinogen despite being approved by the FDA.

Pros:

  • Whole-plant CBD
  • Good brand for beginners (10 mg of CBD per capsule)
  • Third-party tested for potency and purity
  • Simple formula

Cons:

  • No high-strength pills
  • Contains carrageenan
  • Suspended in olive oil

9. Medterra

Medterra is an artisan company based in California that makes premium CBD products from locally grown hemp. The brand offers a modest selection of CBD pills — infused with 25 mg or 50 mg of CBD. Each potency comes in a 30-count bottle.

This is another company that makes CBD products from pure cannabidiol. Despite carrying a potent dose of CBD per serving, these pills for pain don’t leverage the entourage effect, so their efficacy may not be as pronounced as with whole-plant capsules. On a positive note, the CBD is suspended in MCT oil, which improves its absorption.

Pros:

  • Organic hemp
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • Up to 50 mg of CBD per capsule
  • Vegan
  • THC-free
  • Lab-tested for potency and purity

Cons:

  • No entourage effect from other cannabinoids and terpenes
  • A little bit expensive for isolate-based CBD pills

10. Joy Organics

Joy Organics is a family-owned brand with a mission to provide premium-quality products to health-conscious CBD users. Joy Smith, the founder of Joy Organics, launched the company because her products were the only ones that were able to relieve her pain.

Similar to Medterra, Joy Organics sells isolate-based CBD pills, so you won’t find any additional cannabinoids and terpenes there. As a result, their potency may not be as high as expected. At 10 or 25 mg of CBD, these capsules are a good choice for relieving minor aches and pains. However, if you’re looking for a product suited for more serious health needs, we recommend checking out the brands that offer full-spectrum capsules (e.g. Royal CBD or Gold Bee).

Pros:

  • US-grown hemp
  • Available in 2 strengths
  • THC-free
  • Vegan
  • Lab-tested for quality and safety

Cons:

  • Not a full-spectrum extract
  • Only one size is available
  • No high-strength capsules

How Did We Choose the Best CBD Pills for this Ranking?

When the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into law, CBD became a booming industry, experiencing a true renaissance after almost 100 years of prohibition.

Every company that could use a patch of land, an extraction lab, and a web designer, started making CBD extracts from hemp.

Unfortunately, not every company knows how to make high-quality products. And since the market is unregulated, doing research is the consumer’s responsibility these days.

To do the legwork for you, we’ve:

  • Run interviews with more than 10 000 readers using email surveys with a response rate of 64%
  • Looked at the customer reviews section of 30 popular brands to see what customers are saying about their products
  • Tested each product ourselves, closing our ranking with the top 10 CBD pills for pain

Below we give you a detailed overview of the quality criteria that we’ve followed when testing these capsules during our trials.

What’s in the Pills?

CBD pills for pain should be simple, containing a CBD extract, carrier oil, and (usually) a soft gel shell made from gelatin or cellulose. Additionally, the formula may feature supportive ingredients such as complementary herbs and plant extracts that work in synergy with cannabinoids and terpenes.

So, if you want to ensure your CBD pills are safe, you need to check the list of ingredients. Look for terms like “natural” and “pesticide-free” when reading descriptions. US-grown hemp is better than plants imported from overseas because it’s subject to strict quality control measures set out by the USDA.

If you see any suspicious ingredients that you wouldn’t have used at home, you probably don’t need them in your capsules.

Do They Work?

When you take CBD pills for pain, they need to be metabolized by the liver before they can enter your system and start producing their effects. On their way to the bloodstream, they lose some of their potency due to being broken down in the digestive tract, so you need to ensure proper concentration in your capsules.

For example, if your dose of CBD oil is 10 mg twice a day, we suggest that you go for capsules with 25 mg in each piece.

That doesn’t mean you should rush with large doses from the beginning. The best practice is to start low and slowly increase the dose until you notice the difference in how you feel.

Taking more CBD than you need may result in some mild side effects, such as indigestion, dizziness, dry mouth, and appetite fluctuation.

What’s the Source of Hemp?

The source of hemp is the driving factor behind the quality of your CBD capsules. The USA- and Europe-grown hemp is safe because there are special regulatory bodies that supervise the cultivation standards among farmers.

You should steer clear of CBD products that use hemp imported from China because such plants are often grown in contaminated soil, using pesticides and fertilizers to ensure large yields and reduce the growth time.

Hemp is a dynamic bioaccumulator — it will draw every substance from its environment — so the best CBD pills for pain are made from organic hemp that has been grown in clean soil.

Otherwise, the product might be contaminated with heavy metals and the aforementioned toxins.

What Type of Extract do the Capsules Contain?

You can choose from three types of CBD: full-spectrum, broad-spectrum, and isolate.

Choosing the best CBD pills for pain boils down to mapping out your priorities and preferences. The full-spectrum type of CBD comes with the best value in terms of its therapeutic efficacy.

Broad-spectrum extracts are pretty much the same; they only lack trace amounts of THC, which are removed after initial extraction.

CBD isolate is just pure CBD that has been separated from the other hemp compounds. It’s odorless, flavorless, and carries the highest dose of CBD per serving. However, due to the lack of other cannabinoids and terpenes, isolates are devoid of the entourage effect — making them less desired among people who take CBD for pain.

The Lab Reports

This is the most essential point on our list of the factors determining the quality of CBD products. Lab test results are important because it proves the product’s chemical profile and purity — confirming that it’s safe for use.

Since the CBD space isn’t regulated by the FDA, companies should turn to third-party laboratories for content analysis and publish the results in the form of certificates of analysis (COA).

Brands that don’t publish these reports might have something to hide about their purity, which isn’t a good indicator of transparency.

Shipping and Return Policies

Customer-friendly policies in terms of shipping and returns can tell you a lot about the company’s attitude toward its clients. If a company offers limited shipping or has strict return policies, they probably don’t see much beyond their pockets.

Price

Customers are spoiled for choice these days, with the abundance of CBD pills on the market. However, you should always make sure that you get exactly what you paid for. Spend some time comparing different brands and their prices to find the best deals for yourself. The price of CBD is assessed by checking the cost per milligram of CBD.

Coupons and Rewards

CBD products are generally more expensive than other OTC supplements. That’s because making CBD extracts requires a lot of time, effort, and money to manufacture a high-quality product.

Hopefully, most companies offer different ways to save money on their goods. You can take advantage of various gift cards, coupon codes, and reward programs, where you collect special points with every purchase; you can later spend them to lower the price of your next bottle of CBD pills.

Reputation

Reputable companies have been around for some time, gathering a community of returning customers — you can easily verify the credibility of your manufacturer by looking at the review sections of their website.

There was a time where hemp brands could write thousands of fake reviews over the weekend. However, customer awareness has matured, and now, most reputable CBD companies use verified third-party reviews systems with real user opinions.

Can I Use CBD Pills for Pain?

CBD pills for pain contain the same active ingredient as other product types — cannabidiol — which has a long list of science-backed benefits for reducing pain and inflammation.

So, the short answer is yes, you can use CBD pills for pain relief, but their effectiveness will be driven by the following variables:

  • Potency
  • Cannabinoid spectrum
  • Carrier oil
  • Supportive ingredients

Pain and inflammation can dramatically change our daily lives. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) filed a report, in which they found that a little over 20% of the U.S. population experienced chronic pain in 2016 — adding up to 50 million people.

The side effects of conventional painkillers, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have made many people switch to natural remedies, such as CBD pills.

Here’s how CBD capsules can work for pain.

How CBD Works

CBD’s therapeutic versatility derives from its interaction with a complex system of receptors and chemical messengers known as the endocannabinoid system (ECS).

This neurochemical network is responsible for maintaining internal balance throughout the body (homeostasis).

The ECS produces its own CBD-like compounds called endocannabinoids. These molecules modulate the activity of the ECS, including the processes controlled by the other systems and organs in your body.

Cannabinoid receptors are found in almost everybody’s tissue, making the ECS a vital tool for controlling a wide range of important biological processes, such as anxiety, stress response, pain and inflammation, sleep cycles, reproduction, mood, memory, appetite, sleep cycles, and more.

CBD interacts with the CB2 receptors in the immune system; this interaction leads to improved communication between the cells of this system. It can also reduce inflammation and reduce the pain associated with it.

Another way CBD works for pain is through the modulation of pain signaling. CBD influences certain receptors in the body that control pain signals, making them less intense and thus reducing physical discomfort.

Last but not least, CBD works to level endocannabinoid deficiencies, which are associated with a lower tolerance for pain aside from being the potential cause of many pain types, such as migraines and headaches, fibromyalgia, and irritable bowel syndrome among many others.

Research on CBD & Pain

  • In a 2016 study from the European Journal of Pain, the authors concluded that CBD can reduce pain and inflammation in subjects without side effects.
  • A 2020 study on humans that evaluated the effects of CBD on patients with chronic pain found that the analgesic effects of CBD were promising but inconclusive. In some cases, patients didn’t report a significant change in their pain and inflammation markers, while others experienced high levels of pain relief.
  • A 2018 study published in the Frontiers in Veterinary Science found that 2 mg of CBD for every kg of body weight produced beneficial effects for dogs with osteoarthritis. The dogs were treated with CBD for 4 weeks; then, the research team evaluated the results, making it clear that the dogs felt more comfortable after taking CBD, showing increased mobility, activity, and elevated mood. Although the study used an animal model, humans and other animals share the same endocannabinoid system, not to mention common conditions linked to pain.
  • A 2009 research paper found that CBD reduced inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The authors concluded that CBD helped with certain conditions caused by gut inflammation, such as IBS.
  • As reported by a 2015 study published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, CBD demonstrated remarkable anti-inflammatory actions through its interaction with the ECS.

Why CBD Pills Are Great for Pain

Simply put, CBD pills are a decent option for pain relief because they carry the same active ingredient as CBD oils — but are easier to use, more convenient, discreet, and better for traveling.

Here’s why people take CBD pills for pain instead of other formats.

Convenient Form

Using CBD pills for pain is all about functionality. They don’t have any odor or flavor, and they’re also super easy to carry around in a bag or purse. You don’t need to make any measurements and play with the dropper — you just take your daily dose, swallow the capsules with water, and that’s it.

Ease of Use

Some methods make dosing easier than others — and so is the case for CBD capsules. A right dose of CBD can make a noticeable difference in your experience; it can actually be the driving factor behind the product’s efficacy. Although dosing should be gradual, capsules make it easier because they contain a fixed amount of CBD per serving. CBD companies also include their own serving and dosage instructions that you can read on the bottle’s label.

Discreteness

Using CBD oils or vapes can be inconvenient when you’re around others. This isn’t a problem with CBD oil. Since they look like any other softgel cap, nobody will care that you take your supplements; after all, most people take vitamins and minerals in this form.

Long-Lasting Effects

As mentioned, CBD pills need more time to produce their effects, but since the liver gradually releases CBD into the bloodstream, the effects are also extended in time compared to other forms of consumption — lasting up to 12 hours.

How Many CBD Pills Should I Take for Pain?

Your optimal dosage will depend on several individual factors, such as your age, gender, weight, metabolism, tolerance, and severity of pain. There’s no one-size-fits-all dosage of CBD pills for pain because everyone is different.

CBD isn’t regulated by the FDA, so they won’t provide their dosage guidelines — shedding the responsibility on the shoulders of consumers.

Finding the right dose requires some experimentation, so the best way is to take the classic low-and-slow approach.

Start with a small dose — up to 5 mg — and gradually increase the amount every few days to check how your body reacts to different doses. Just don’t rush with a large dose right from the start. High doses of CBD may not be necessary to help you manage pain, so you might be overdoing your pills.

According to one study, a dose of 6.2 mg of CBD per day produced similar pain relief in arthritis patients as 62.3 mg per day. However, it’s worth noting that the results varied between patients, underscoring the importance of the individual approach to treating pain with CBD.

What’s the Bioavailability of CBD Pills?

Bioavailability describes the leftover amount of CBD that your body can use after ingestion.

Oral products — including CBD pills — come with the lowest bioavailability of all available formats, reaching 20% at max. This means that if you take 50 mg of CBD, you’ll end up using up to 10 mg. This is the side effect of CBD passing through the gastrointestinal tract.

When Should I Take CBD Pills for Pain?

Similar to dosage, there is no such thing as the best time to take CBD pills for pain. You just take them as needed. When it hurts, take CBD capsules immediately. If you live with chronic pain, start with a morning dose and take CBD throughout the day to prevent flare-ups or ease your discomfort. Some CBD pills are specifically formulated to address pain, so if you have a chronic condition, you may want to look for products with supportive ingredients, such as turmeric or hemp oil as the carrier.

Will CBD Pills Get Me High?

Unless you take marijuana-derived CBD pills, chances of getting high are close to zero. That’s because hemp-derived CBD pills contain no more than 0.3% of THC. At such a low concentration, it’s impossible to achieve an intoxicating effect. Broad-spectrum and isolate-based CBD capsules are completely free of THC, so the high shouldn’t bother you at all.

Key Takeaways on CBD Pills and Pain

People living with chronic inflammation, which prevents them from partaking in their favorite activities or causes health problems like insomnia, often choose CBD pills as their daily driver.

If pain is your regular companion, the health benefits provided by CBD should, at least, help you reduce physical discomfort due to its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects.

Aside from easing pain and reducing inflammation, CBD works to help your endocannabinoid system maintain homeostasis throughout the body, including a normal pain threshold and proper signaling to the brain.

If the taste of CBD oil is off-putting to you, capsules are a decent alternative. Not only are they easier to take, but they also don’t carry any odor and flavor.

Everywhere you listen, people take CBD for a wide wide range of health concerns. Unfortunately, the CBD niche is still young, and consumers need to verify the credibility of different hemp brands on their own.

If you’re in a rush, feel free to use the recommendations from our ranking. You can also take some time to run your own research, using the same criteria we’ve applied when making this list.

References:

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics. (2020). Chronic Pain and High-impact Chronic Pain Among U.S. Adults, 2019. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db390.htm
  2. Nagarkatti, P., Pandey, R., Rieder, S. A., Hegde, V. L., & Nagarkatti, M. (2009). Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs. Future medicinal chemistry, 1(7), 1333–1349. https://doi.org/10.4155/fmc.09.93
  3. Muller, C., Morales, P., & Reggio, P. H. (2019). Cannabinoid Ligands Targeting TRP Channels. Frontiers in molecular neuroscience, 11, 487. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnmol.2018.00487 (3)
  4. Leweke, F. M., Piomelli, D., Pahlisch, F., Muhl, D., Gerth, C. W., Hoyer, C., Klosterkötter, J., Hellmich, M., & Koethe, D. (2012). Cannabidiol enhances anandamide signaling and alleviates psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. Translational psychiatry, 2(3), e94. https://doi.org/10.1038/tp.2012.15
  5. Hammell, D. C., Zhang, L. P., Ma, F., Abshire, S. M., McIlwrath, S. L., Stinchcomb, A. L., & Westlund, K. N. (2016). Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviors in a rat model of arthritis. European journal of pain (London, England), 20(6), 936–948. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.818
  6. Argueta, D. A., Ventura, C. M., Kiven, S., Sagi, V., & Gupta, K. (2020). A Balanced Approach for Cannabidiol Use in Chronic Pain. Frontiers in pharmacology, 11, 561. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.00561 (6)
  7. Gamble, L. J., Boesch, J. M., Frye, C. W., Schwark, W. S., Mann, S., Wolfe, L., Brown, H., Berthelsen, E. S., & Wakshlag, J. J. (2018). Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Clinical Efficacy of Cannabidiol Treatment in Osteoarthritic Dogs. Frontiers in veterinary science, 5, 165. https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2018.00165 (7)
  8. Al-Ghezi, Z. Z., Busbee, P. B., Alghetaa, H., Nagarkatti, P. S., & Nagarkatti, M. (2019). Combination of cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), mitigates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by altering the gut microbiome. Brain, behavior, and immunity, 82, 25–35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2019.07.028 (8)
  9. Lehmann, C., Fisher, N. B., Tugwell, B., Szczesniak, A., Kelly, M., & Zhou, J. (2016). Experimental cannabidiol treatment reduces early pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes. Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation, 64(4), 655–662. https://doi.org/10.3233/CH-168021
  10. Burstein S. (2015). Cannabidiol (CBD) and its analogs: a review of their effects on inflammation. Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry, 23(7), 1377–1385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2015.01.059
Nina Julia

Nina created CFAH.org following the birth of her second child. She was a science and math teacher for 6 years prior to becoming a parent — teaching in schools in White Plains, New York and later in Paterson, New Jersey.

Leave a comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.