ises for cbd oil

Are Your Patients Taking CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is having its moment in the sun. A Gallup poll from last August found that 1 in 7 Americans use CBD, that 11% of users are 50 to 64 years of age, and that 8% are at least 65 years of age. Pain relief, anxiety, insomnia, and arthritis are the top reasons for use. Nearly 4 in 10 Americans think CBD oils should be legally available for adults to buy over the counter.

Although the 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp (cannabis and cannabis derivatives such as CBD that contain less than 0.3% THC) from the definition of marijuana under the federal Controlled Substances Act — and many states have legalized medical marijuana or CBD — the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers CBD products within its purview to regulate. The agency has approved only one CBD-based drug, Epidiolex, which was approved to treat two rare forms of epilepsy.

“Unlike the FDA-approved CBD drug product, unapproved CBD products, which could include unapproved drugs, cosmetics, foods, and products marketed as dietary supplements, have not been subject to FDA evaluation regarding whether they are effective to treat a particular disease or have other effects that may be claimed,” according to an article on the FDA’s website.

“The main thing you can say about CBD is that we unfortunately know very little about it in humans,” Diana Martinez, MD, a psychiatrist and addiction expert at Columbia University in New York City, said in an interview published on Medscape last May. She noted that many people take CBD for anxiety, and although there is some evidence to support it, there have been no placebo-controlled studies with large numbers of patients with anxiety disorders. “Is it a placebo effect? It may be. We don’t know,” Martinez said.

How to use CBD Oil Soap on Your Skin?

As a bath product enthusiast −ok, maybe addict − I tend to use bath and body products as my vehicle to dip my toe in the proverbial bath water so to speak! While some people may choose to try the latest news worthy remedies and ingredients in cooking, I try them in the bath or shower! When I first desired to experiment with aromatherapy, I tried bath bombs infused with essential oils.

When I read about the benefits of charcoal, I immediately ordered a charcoal based facial cleanser! When I wanted to partake in the kale craze, I ran to the drugstore for a kale face mask. And now, with CBD products used in everything from beverages, to chocolates to dog treats, it’s time to see what this latest elixir has in store for the personal care marketplace!

What CBD soap does NOT do

First, to dispel the rumors and misinformation floating around, CBD soap does not get one high! Most soap companies, and is definitely the case with Manos Soap Co., use pure CBD full spectrum in their products which contain .03 THC. CBD is the non-psychotropic component of marijuana or hemp.

Pure CBD Oil Sourced

We source our CBD oil from extremely reputable and reliable suppliers such as Charlotte’s Web CBD Oil, and requires testing to guarantee only pure CBD Oil is used in its Cannabidiol Soap. In addition, as further reassurance for those considering a CBD Oil soap bar, keep in mind that the soap’s lather only sits on one’s skin for a minute or two, so only a small amount of CBD is ever absorbed in your system.

Benefits of CBD Soap on your Skin

So now that you know you won’t get high using this soap, what are the benefits for skin and body?

Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant

Most importantly, CBD oil is known to for its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties! When added to a soap bar, these properties help maintain healthy skin and contribute to overall well being. When added to a topical cleansing bar, CBD Oil can combat acne by reducing over activity of the sebaceous glands. By reducing the production by these glands, skin is less prone to break-outs.

Anti-aging

Also of particular interest to me, and many others of a certain age, is the anti-aging aspects of CBD Oil. Research suggests that facial soaps that contain CBD Oil as one of the key ingredients have a dramatic impact on slowing down the visible signs of aging such as wrinkles, dull skin and a ruddy complexion. CBD’s anti-oxidant properties fight free radical damage much like many of the fresh and colorful fruits and vegetables we are encouraged to consume for this same reason!

Hydrates Dry Skin

CBD oil is particularly popular in treating dry, itchy and inflamed skin. Serious outbreaks of these conditions known to many of us only on occasion are typically caused by psoriasis and eczema, both tied to the immune system. Studies indicate that CBD is remarkably effective in inhibiting the body’s inflammatory responses and associated pain caused by psoriasis and eczema. As a result, CBD Oil soaps show great potential for treating these skin conditions as well as many other inflammatory diseases.

Reap the Benefits of CBD Soap

With new research and evidence released almost daily with respect to CBD Oil and the positive impact it is having in a variety of areas, it is no wonder so many are seeking effective ways to incorporate CBD in our daily lives. So, just like any other soap – use a CBD Oil soap such as our CBD Oil Soap Bar to lather, rinse, and repeat if so desired!

Maximizing CBD’s Effects and Benefits: 5 Experts Weigh In

Is CBD the magic cannabis molecule, or a misleading fad? There’s certainly a major trend toward CBD-only products on the cannabis market, and a push in some states leery of medical marijuana to legalize only one or two cannabinoids. Yet many are fighting back against this approach. That’s because there’s an interactive synergy between cannabis compounds, known as the entourage effect, and many benefits attributed broadly to cannabis can only be unlocked through “whole plant medicine” – that is, with THC, CBD, terpenes, and other cannabinoids working together in sync.

Whole plant medicine has been widely debated as many states consider limited legalization of cannabinoids like CBD, and the idea that the entourage effect is integral to using cannabis as medicine is increasingly accepted. In fact, some products are being designed specifically to maximize the value of whole plant medicine for the consumer. Take Firefly’s vaporizer technology, which sets out to capture all the myriad benefits of the entourage effect through dynamic convection technology. “[Firefly 2 was] truly designed around the plant…in order to deliver all the cannabinoids and terpenes in the most efficient way,” says Rachel Dugas of Firefly. Yet given the complexities of these chemical interactions, it’s still hard to pin down how exactly this maximizes the benefits of cannabis.

What the Experts Say About CBD’s Effects and Benefits

To shed some light on the subject, we assembled a panel of five experts in different areas of the cannabis space to weigh in:

  • Jessica Peters (founder, Moxie Meds);
  • Constance Finley (founder and CEO, Constance Therapeutics);
  • Mary Lynn Mathre RN, MSN (president and co-founder, Patients Out of Time);
  • Eloise Theisen RN, MSN (director, American Cannabis Nurses Association);
  • Perry Solomon, MD (chief medical officer, HelloMD).

Here’s what they had to say.

What effects does CBD have on its own?

Mary Lynn Mathre: “Many – anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, anti-seizure, neuroprotective, bone stimulant, anti-spasmodic, and more.”

Jessica Peters: “Anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmodic, anti-proliferative, analgesic, anxiolytic (anti-anxiety), neuroprotective, anti-psychotic, anti-emetic (anti-nausea) … I can technically answer what are the properties of CBD, but these properties might not pop out if THC is not present. A potential new research category that I’ve seen evidence of anecdotally are addiction-fighting properties … CBD seems to reroute those neural pathways.”

Constance Finley: “Studies have shown CBD to have a positive effect on inflammation, pain, anxiety, psychosis and spasms, but it should be noted that most of these applications are not treated with just CBD alone and in fact do require some level of THC, whose role as a phytotherapeutic compound has already been established vis-à-vis many of the same conditions. CBD acts on different receptors than THC in the body.”

Perry Solomon: “It’s been found that CBD alone can cause a feeling of calm, relaxation. CBD’s other medicinal effects stem from completely separate pathways, such as the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), mu and delta opioid receptors. Taken on its own, CBD has sedative, antioxidant, anti-anxiety, and antidepressant effects on the brain, but does not create any overtly psychoactive high like THC. It’s also been shown to have change gene expression and remove beta amyloid plaque, the hallmark of Alzheimer’s, from brain cells.”

How are these effects augmented or altered by other compounds?

Peters: “Pretty significantly. CBD being cannabis-based is what’s most crucial for these properties to exist. The range of the volume of THC in relation to CBD will feature different properties. An equal amount of THC to CBD [for example] is often the best pain reliever. Many terpenes have relationships [and] the fact that those relationships exist is becoming clearer and clearer.”

Eloise Theisen: “CBD and THC seem to work better together. They lessen each other’s side effects.”

Solomon: “THC seems to potentiate all the effects of CBD and conversely, CBD affects THC. Dr. Ethan Russo further supports this theory by demonstrating that non-cannabinoid plant components such as terpenes serve as inhibitors to THC’s intoxicating effects, thereby increasing THC’s therapeutic index. This ‘phytocannabinoid-terpenoid synergy,’ as Russo calls it, increases the potential of cannabis-based medicinal extracts to treat pain, inflammation, fungal and bacterial infections, depression, anxiety, addiction, epilepsy, and even cancer … Terpenes act on receptors and neurotransmitters; they are prone to combine with or dissolve in lipids or fats; they act as serotonin uptake inhibitors (similar to antidepressants like Prozac); they enhance norepinephrine activity (similar to tricyclic antidepressants like Elavil); they increase dopamine activity; and they augment GABA (the “downer” neurotransmitter that counters glutamate, the “upper”). However, more specific research is needed.”

Mathre: “CBD has value, but its value can be enhanced with the whole plant and we can develop more individualized medicine (specific ratios depending upon the person and the need).”

How much more effective would you say whole-plant medicine is than CBD-only?

Peters: “Radically. Not even close. It’s as though you’re working with different substances.”

Solomon: “I think that any whole plant medicine is more effective then any CBD-only product.”

Theisen: “Whole plant medicine is the only way to go.”

Mathre: “Safer and more effective, and tolerance will develop more slowly (if at all).”

Finley: “In almost all cases…I would say whole-plant therapeutics are 100% more effective than CBD-only.”

Thoughts on those who exclude THC or other cannabis components from the realm of medicinal cannabis?

Finley: “I believe everyone should have access to all types of treatment options that could potentially benefit them, and people need to be aware that not all cannabis is created equal. CBD from hemp does not have the medicinal properties that CBD from cannabis possesses, and is frankly an inferior product.”

Mathre: “We have lawyers and politicians practicing medicine without a license – they don’t know what they are talking about. Clearly there may be some patients who need little to no THC, but the vast majority will benefit from it. Patients should have all of the options open to them and research needs to continue to help determine how to best individualize cannabis medicine.”

Peters: “It’s so extraordinarily problematic that it feels criminal to me… The wall of bureaucracy is pushing up against the wall of science.”

What is the best way to consume cannabis to access its complete entourage of effects?

Finley: “Delivery methods vary greatly in terms of their efficiency and their effects. I heard a colleague say that smoking a joint for therapeutic effect is akin to opening your mouth in the rain to get a drink of water … Our preferred methods [are] buccal ingestion or sublingual ingestion, vaping from a vaporizer or vape pen whose hardware is safe to use with cannabis extracts, and topical for additional localized impact.”

Peters: “Certainly vaporizing flowers is one of the easiest options. I would [also] say tinctures … especially full plant and alcohol-extracted (with organic ethanol).”

Theisen: “Vaporization or tinctures of whole plants. Any sort of extraction method that isn’t going to deplete it.”

How Vaporizer Technology Can Maximize the Entourage Effect

In the vaporizer world, dynamic convection is the process by which vapes can capture a complete range of active ingredients and flavors in cannabis flowers and full-plant concentrates. This maximizes efficiency and optimizes the benefits of the entourage effect for the consumer. As vaporizer technology continues to advance in this direction, it will become easier and easier for patients to explore the benefits of whole plant medicine for themselves, and hone in on the cannabis strains best suited to their needs.

To learn more about dynamic convection technology in the Firefly 2, please visit the sponsor’s website.