recommended cbd oil dosage for dogs

We have created two lines of the highest quality CBD hemp oils so you can find the perfect option for your companions!

The amount you should give your cat or dog depends on two main factors:

  1. Your pet’s weight
  2. What you’re utilizing the product for

It’s important to first base usage information off of your pet’s weight as an effective starting point. Depending on your pet’s health needs, try starting out with our recommended usage amount and increase the amount of product given until you see desired results. There are no known or documented overdoses on a full spectrum CBD hemp products.

It’s important to note that all of our CBD hemp oils for dogs is safe of all sizes, however, each one potency was developed with a certain size in mind.

Pet Releaf Hemp Oils

  • Contains Certified USDA Organic full spectrum CBD hemp oil
  • Mixed with Organic Coconut Oil (MCT)
  • Should be administered directly into the mouth for max absorption
  • Quickest way to get Pet Releaf USDA organic full spectrum CBD hemp oil into the blood stream
  • Best options for pets who can take the product directly in mouth without the assistance of a teaser amount of food or treat.

Usage information

CBD Hemp Oil 330 — 100mg Active CBD (for small dogs and cats)

Dog Weight Hemp Oil 330 Usage Bottle Usage

1-25lbs 1.5 full droppers per day 20 days

26-50lbs 2.5 full droppers per day 12 days

Cat Weight Hemp Oil 330 Usage Bottle Usage

1-15lbs 1 full dropper per day 30 days

Over 15lbs 1.5 full droppers per day 20 days

CBD Hemp Oil 700 — 200mg Active CBD (for small to medium sized dogs)

Dog Weight Hemp Oil 700 Usage Bottle Usage

1-25lbs 0.75 full droppers per day 40 days

26-50lbs 1.5 full droppers per day 20 days

51-75lbs 2 full droppers per day 15 days

76-100lbs 2.75 full droppers per day 11 days

CBD Hemp Oil 1700 — 500mg Active CBD (for large breed dogs)

Dog Weight Hemp Oil 1700 Usage Bottle Usage

26-50lbs 0.5 full dropper per day 60 days

51-75lbs 1 full dropper per day 30 days

76-100lbs 1.5 full droppers per day 20 days

101-150lbs 2 full droppers per day 15 days

150+ lbs 2.75 full droppers per day 11 days

150/450mg organic CBD Hemp Oil Capsules — 15mg Active CBD per capsule (for medium to large breed dogs)

Dog Weight Capsule Daily Usage Bottle Usage

40-75lbs 1 capsule per day 30 days

76-125lbs 2 capsules per day 15 days

126-175lbs 3 capsules per day 10 days

Pet Releaf Liposomes Hemp Oils

  • Contains Certified USDA Organic full spectrum CBD hemp oil
  • Mixed with sustainably-sourced Wild Alaskan Red Pollock Oil
  • Should be administered during mealtime
  • Bottle lasts 3x longer than traditional oil when administered during mealtime
  • Best options for pets who are a bit more finicky and require the usage of food or a treat to take supplements or medications

Liposome Hemp Oil 330 — 100mg: (for small to medium sized dogs & cats)

Dog Weight Liposomes Hemp Oil 330 Usage Bottle Usage

1-25lbs 0.5 full dropper per day 60 days

25-50lbs 0.75 full droppers per day 40 days

51-75lbs 1 full dropper per day 30 days

76-100lbs 1.25 full droppers per day 24 days

Cat Weight Liposomes Hemp Oil 330 Usage Bottle Usage

1-15lbs 0.25 full dropper per day 120 days

Over 15lbs 0.5 full droppers per day 60 days

Liposome Hemp Oil 1000 — 300mg (for medium to large breed dogs)

Dog Weight Liposomes Hemp Oil 1000 Usage Bottle Usage

26-50lbs 0.25 full dropper per day 120 days

51-75lbs 0.5 full dropper per day 60 days

76-100lbs 0.75 full droppers per day 40 days

101-150lbs 1 full dropper per day 30 days

Over 150lbs 2 droppers per day 15 days

Since CBD hemp oil has no known contraindications (won’t interfere with other medications) and your pet cannot overdose on Pet Releaf products.

How long until I start seeing results?

Results differ from pet to pet. Some pet parents see results within 30 minutes of administering our products while others don’t notice an impact until a couple days of giving their companion the recommended usage. In order to see the benefits of our products as soon as possible, make sure you’re following our administration recommendations.

CBD and Your Pet: What You Need to Know

With the legalization of cannabis, more and more pet owners are looking to explore the therapeutic potential of this ancient plant.

Since cannabis legalization came into effect in Canada, there is an increasing number of companies selling cannabis-based products for pets. The majority of these products are derived from hemp, the fibrous form of the Cannabis sativa plant. In comparison to other varietals of cannabis, hemp contains higher concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD) and must contain less than 0.3% THC.

CBD is the compound most sought after by pet owners. It is one of over a hundred cannabinoid compounds that naturally occur in cannabis 1 2 . CBD is non-intoxicating, meaning it does not produce the “high” that is associated with THC.

In humans, cannabinoids have been approved to treat a variety of conditions that include AIDS-related anorexia, nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, epilepsy, and pain related to cancer or multiple sclerosis. There is also clinical evidence that cannabinoids have the potential to treat other conditions, such as anxiety, depression, inflammation and cancer 3 4 .

How Do Cannabinoids Affect Pets?

In veterinary medicine, there are a limited number of studies on the effects of cannabinoids in pets such as cats and dogs. In humans, we know that cannabinoids interact with endocannabinoid receptors in the body’s central and peripheral nervous system to control a wide range of important bodily functions.

Dogs have more endocannabinoid receptors in their brains than humans, which makes researchers suspect that dogs might more sensitive to the effects of cannabinoids than we are 5 . One thing that is clear is that THC, the psychoactive compound in cannabis, is toxic to dogs and cats. The majority of research so far has focused on these toxic effects 6 . The most common cause of cannabis poisoning comes from pets ingesting the owner’s supply—most commonly edible products, like cannabis-infused cookies, or plant material 7 .

Clinical signs of intoxication from THC include depression, increased production of saliva, dilation of the pupils, uncontrolled movement of the limbs, vomiting, urinary incontinence, tremors, hypothermia and decreased heart rate 8 . Higher doses may also cause problems with vision, agitation, rapid breathing, an increased heart rate, problems with the nervous system, hyperexcitability and seizures. The smallest lethal dose is 3 grams of cannabis plant material per kilogram of the pet’s weight 9 .

Death from THC intoxication is rare in animals. However, pet owners should be aware of the symptoms above and consult a veterinarian immediately if they think THC poisoning has occurred. Treatment for THC poisoning typically consists of close observation, hydration and ensuring the animal’s comfort while their body processes the material.

While THC is toxic to dogs and cats, clinical studies on CBD for dogs have shown so far that isolated CBD is considered safe 10 11 .

Therapeutic Potential of CBD in Pets

While there have not been many rigorous studies yet on CBD for pets, many pet owners report that they have successfully used CBD to treat symptoms of arthritis, epilepsy and anxiety in their furry companions 12 13 .

One of the few studies examining the benefits of CBD for dogs suggests that CBD can increase the comfort and activity levels of dogs suffering from osteoarthritis (OA). Dogs that received CBD oil (2mg/kg) every 12 hours for 4 weeks had significantly less pain and increased activity compared to dogs that received a placebo treatment 14 .

CBD may also have the potential to treat epilepsy, which is the most common chronic neurological disorder in dogs 15 . Preliminary results from a study at Colorado State University show that CBD can reduce the frequency of seizures in dogs suffering from epilepsy 16 .

Due to the limited number of studies conducted in cats and dogs, the best evidence for the therapeutic potential of CBD comes from human studies, where there is evidence that CBD can treat pain and inflammation from diseases other than arthritis and also relieve anxiety.

Risks of Using CBD in Pets

Pet owners should use caution when considering CBD-based products to treat their pet. Unlike medical cannabis products for humans, which are produced under strict regulatory conditions for safety and quality, pet-oriented cannabis products have no such regulation. In addition, there are currently no products approved by Health Canada for use in animals.

While CBD appears to be safe for pets, many veterinarian doctors are hesitant to recommend it for two reasons: one, because there are no rigorous scientific studies to confirm the safety and effectiveness of CBD for pets; and two, because the quality of these products is not guaranteed. A 2015 review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of various CBD products for pets found that some products did not contain the CBD concentrations indicated on the label or were contaminated with unlabeled concentrations of THC 17 , which is toxic to cats and dogs 18 .

How to Choose a CBD Product

When choosing a CBD-based product for a pet, owners should look for products that have undergone third-party testing. This will should confirm the actual CBD concentration in the product and whether or not THC is present.

CBD Dosing

While no therapeutic guidelines exist for dosing CBD for pets, it is recommended that owners follow the “start low, go slow” principle and keep a journal of the doses they give to their pet and the reactions they observe 19 . The easiest way to control CBD dosage is using a CBD oil, rather than an edible product because ingested products result in uneven and slow absorption into the body 20 .

Summary

With the legalization of cannabis in Canada, more and more pet owners are looking to explore the therapeutic potential of this ancient plant. While scientific evidence is limited, preliminary studies have so far shown that CBD seems to be safe for dogs, and may have therapeutic potential to treat epileptic seizures and symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Pet owners should use caution when using CBD products; however, since they are currently unregulated and not approved by Health Canada for use in animals. Unregulated CBD products have been found sometimes to contain THC, which is toxic to dogs and cats.

More research into the safety and effectiveness of CBD as a treatment for pets is needed, but some owners may find that with a third-party tested product, CBD could be an effective treatment for their beloved companions.

References

[1] Aizpurua-Olaizola O, Elezgarai I, Rico-Barrio I, Zarandona I, Etxebarria N, Usobiaga A. Targeting the endocannabinoid system: future therapeutic strategies. Drug Discov Today. 2017;22(1):105-110.

[2] Morales P, Hurst DP, Reggio PH. Molecular Targets of the Phytocannabinoids: A Complex Picture. Prog Chem Org Nat Prod. 2017;103:103-131.

[3] Abrams DI. The therapeutic effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids: An update from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine report. Eur J Intern Med. 2018;49:7-11.

[4] Whiting PF, Wolff RF, Deshpande S, et al. Cannabinoids for medical use: A systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA. 2015;313(24):2456-2473.

[5] Fitzgerald KT, Bronstein AC, Newquist KL. Marijuana Poisoning. Topics in Companion Animal Medicine. 2013;28(1):8-12.

[6] Brutlag A, Hommerding H. Toxicology of Marijuana, Synthetic Cannabinoids, and Cannabidiol in Dogs and Cats. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice. 2018;48(6):1087-1102.

[7] Fitzgerald KT, Bronstein AC, Newquist KL. Marijuana Poisoning. Topics in Companion Animal Medicine. 2013;28(1):8-12.

[8] Fitzgerald KT, Bronstein AC, Newquist KL. Marijuana Poisoning. Topics in Companion Animal Medicine. 2013;28(1):8-12.

[9] Fitzgerald KT, Bronstein AC, Newquist KL. Marijuana Poisoning. Topics in Companion Animal Medicine. 2013;28(1):8-12.

[10] Bartner LR, McGrath S, Rao S, Hyatt LK, Wittenburg LA. Pharmacokinetics of cannabidiol administered by 3 delivery methods at 2 different dosages to healthy dogs. Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research. 2018;82(3):178-183.

[11] Gamble LJ, Boesch JM, Frye CW, et al. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Clinical Efficacy of Cannabidiol Treatment in Osteoarthritic Dogs. Front Vet Sci. 2018;5:165.

[12] Pettanicals. Testimonials. 2018; https://pettanicals.ca/testimonials/. Accessed February 11, 2019.

[13] Berk BA, Packer RMA, Law TH, Volk HA. Investigating owner use of dietary supplements in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Research in Veterinary Science. 2018;119:276-284.

[14] Gamble LJ, Boesch JM, Frye CW, et al. Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Clinical Efficacy of Cannabidiol Treatment in Osteoarthritic Dogs. Front Vet Sci. 2018;5:165.

[15] Kearsley-Fleet L, O’Neill DG, Volk HA, Church DB, Brodbelt DC. Prevalence and risk factors for canine epilepsy of unknown origin in the UK. Vet Rec. 2013;172(13):338.

[16] Guiden M. Preliminary data from CBD clinical trials’ promising’. College News: News from the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences2018.

[17] U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Warning Letters and Test Results for Cannabidiol-Related Products. 2015; https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm484109.htm. Accessed February 7, 2019.

[18] Brutlag A, Hommerding H. Toxicology of Marijuana, Synthetic Cannabinoids, and Cannabidiol in Dogs and Cats. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice. 2018;48(6):1087-1102.

[19] Canadian Association of Veterinary Cannabinoid Medicine. Treatment Dosing & Monitoring. 2018; https://www.cavcm.com/resources-for-pet-families. Accessed February 7, 2018.

[20] Fitzgerald KT, Bronstein AC, Newquist KL. Marijuana Poisoning. Topics in Companion Animal Medicine. 2013;28(1):8-12.