Seeding Weed

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Seeding Weed

Since releasing this year’s FREE Guide To Fall Seeding we have had some questions come about spraying weeds now leading up to the seeding. In and this blog post will answer those.

First off, you do NOT have to kill all the weeds. The winter is going to kill them for you and having a few here and there will not get in your way too badly. However, if you have had a big emergence of crabgrass in your lawn (where it is all you can see), you will want to try and knock that back some – mainly so it doesn’t go to seed on you.

It’s probably hard for you to tell, but this lawn here is in Munster, IN and this is 99% crabgrass.

Here is what it looks like up close:

If this is you, you will want to spray this and start knocking it down. Leaving it in there is good because it will help hold your seed in place but for sure, if your lawn is this thick with crabgrass, hose it good with quinclorac , quincept or mesotrione leading up to seeding following the recommendations below.

Note on Details:

I’m going to get highly detailed here because I respect you and your intelligence. You’re smart and therefore you can and should seek to understand these chems so you can get the proper result from using them and have no fear of them. I respect the fact that once you take the time to understand this example, you will be better at discernment of similar questions in the future and thus you will be more confident in your approach and strategy. In other words, I’m not going to talk to you like you’re dumb and just tell you what to do. Instead I’m going to teach you like a professional. I hope you are good with that.

Second, I respect the green industry and the lawn pros who make their living doing this day in and day out. When you use professional formulations of products like the ones listed here, I now view you on their level and that also means we need to stay within the bounds of the label which is the law. If you see YouTubers or social media influencers out there not following the label, including me, you should call them/me out. Everyone makes mistakes here and there, but it’s their reaction to being called out that truly shows their intent. I like to think everyone means well and is willing to admit when they are wrong.

Can I Spray Weeds and Kill Crabgrass Now if I Plan to Seed In September/Fall Time?

This is the most common question and it’s difficult to answer for all of you so I’m going to show you how to find the answer for yourself using 2 examples.

Reading The Label – Quinclorac 75DF

Key: The answer to your question is on the label. Labels of weed control products almost always tell you the wait time until seeding after application. Let’s look at two that you likely may be using.

First one is quinclorac . This is the first choice active ingredient that kills crabgrass that you may be seeing. If your lawn is covered in crabgrass like a carpet – especially through the middle or meaty part of the lawn, you will want to kill it off or at least stunt it really well before seeding.

The formulation most of you have is the “DF” which stands for “dry flowable” which means it’s small granules that you put in water to make a solution to spray. The concentration is 75% quinclorac.

Here’s the trick to reading labels fast. Find the PDF online. Make sure it is the VERY SAME product you have in hand. DoMyOwn is a great resource for this .

Once you pull up the label, hit “command F” on Mac or “control F” on PC and this opens up a search window. Type the word “Seed” in that window and it will reveal how many times that word appears in the label PDF.

Use the down arrows in that window to “scroll” through all the instances where that word appears. As I did this, I found the following very quickly.

So we can see that for certain types of seedings, this product won’t cause any harm at all but we have to scroll down to the tables 1 and 4 to get the details. Table 1 is going to tell us the grass types that are “highly” and “moderately” tolerant and table 4 will tell us the timing of the applications for ANY seeding.

This is where it sometimes gets confusing so follow along with me.

Here is Table 1

So what this is telling us is that you can use Quinclorac 75DF on established grasses listed as “highly” or “moderately” tolerant. That is really all this chart is for. It has nothing to do with seeding, hence the word “established.” But you still have to look at this chart first to find out if you should even use this product in the first place.

It’s main purpose is to tell you that you should not use this product on Bahia, Colonial Bent, Centipede or St Aug, period. Doesn’t matter if you are seeding or not, you should NOT use this product on these grass types. It also warns you about using it in or around fine fescues – they must be part of a blend if you do.

So in our case, where we are thinking about seeding the lawn, if we are planning to seed Bahia grass for example, then this product is out, 100%. No Bueno.

So if you passed the test on this part and are seeding Kentucky Bluegrass for example, then you need to next consult table 4 which is going to give you the timing of seeding both before and after.

Let’s stick with our example of Kentucky Bluegrass and you can see that it’s ok to apply quinclorac to the lawn to kill crabgrass 7 days before seeding or more. So right now, if you are let’s say 2 weeks away from seeding, you are welcome to spray away and kill that crabgrass dead. (note, this product turns crabgrass orange/red in about 6 days. But it takes much longer for the crabgrass to fully break down so likely some of it will still be there when you seed, just red and dead).

See also  Best Cannabis Seeds For Hydroponics

Also of note, if you have crabgrass living after or during your seed grow in, you have to wait 28 days after emergence (when you see it) before spraying. It’s important to understand what mix you are seeding in this case because if you have a tall fescue, bluegrass mixed seed , the tall fescue will emerge in about 10 days but the bluegrass won’t emerge for 18-21 days so you need to wait 28 days AFTER THE BLUEGRASS emerges before spraying quinclorac. If you really want to be safe, wait the 28 days and 1-2 mowings before applying – this adds some extra protection for the late bloomers as mowing encourages new grass to “harden off” quicker.

Reading The Label – Seeding and Tenacity – Mesotrione

( we have the generic which is cheaper FYI)I will throw this one in real quick because it’s a little different. We recommend this product for a pre-emergent application at the time of seeding. It will suppress certain weeds in your grow in. If you are new and inexperienced, DO NOT think you have to use this – your results will be ok without it. But if you do use it, people think they can just spray it anytime they want and this is not true.

You can spray it anytime you want leading up to seed day, and on seed day, but once your seeds germinate, you should NOT spray it again until the new gras has been mowed 2-4 times or 4 weeks whichever is longer.

So to be clear – you can apply this up to seeding, but once the seed germinates (4-5 days for rye, up to 21 days for bluegrass) you should NOT apply it to weeds until the new turf has been mowed 2-4 times or 4 weeks, whichever is longer. This is because baby grass is weak and can’t withstand/tolerate mesotrione .

Reading The Label – Speed Zone – Red Label

This is another weed control I have recommended heavily and they list right on the label in clear printing how long to wait until you seed. Keep in mind, this product has an 85F degree temp restriction anyway so many of you would not be using it in summer, but in case you did, here is the wait time after app before seeding:

Reading the Label – Quincept – New Farm

Ok now just as I make everything seem like it’s as simple as reading the label, NuFarm (who I love) comes in and just leaves it off their Quincept label completely . Maybe someone from NuFarm can Tweet me and let me know why y’all have left this off your label for so many years… is there a typo you have not corrected? I have read and read the label and this is all I can find – it’s all about “spraying after you seed” but nothing about “spraying before you seed.”

You can read that all you want, backward and forward and it only tells you about “after” seeding. And since I have recommended this weed control so heavily this year I feel like I need to provide an answer.

First off, when I worked for TruGreen ChemLawn, Quincept was our go-to weed control for summer and I remember that every year that right around 3 weeks before overseeding time we would get a memo telling us to cut off the Quincept use. The memo would come early but would read “stop spraying Quincept 2 weeks prior to starting your overseedings for customers.”

So that is my first clue as to the reseed window – it comes from my experience.

Next, I found a product that is similar to Quincept in that it has the same active ingredients plus one. That is Q4 Plus . It has very similar concentrations of the active ingredients within the Quincept plus one more. That product says this:

In short, if you are using Quincept, wait a minimum of 14 days after application to throw down your grass seed. I had to use some logic with this one and figured I’d share it just in case you are doing all the research and coming up empty. Now you know.

So there you go, all about reading labels for seeding – hope this has helped you and that your seeding will be successful this season!

ABOUT US

Welcome to the official site of Allyn Hane, The Lawn Care Nut from YouTube. Here you will find my free newsletter that gives you much more than just the tip. I also carry the full line of N-Ext soil optimization products including RGS, Air8 and De-Thatch along with MicroGreen and Green Effect plus much more!

How to care for your cannabis seedling

When you’re growing cannabis, you want to keep your plants strong and healthy through every stage of the growing process — and that includes the seedling stage.

The seedling stage can be an especially vulnerable time in the growing process. The cannabis seedling is in need of a lot of TLC to grow into a healthy cannabis plant.

In the seedling stage the cannabis seedling is in need of a lot of TLC to grow into a healthy cannabis plant. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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But what does that TLC look like? What steps do you need to take to support your cannabis seedlings through the seedling stage and as they grow into mature marijuana plants?

Let’s take a deep dive into how to care for your baby marijuana plant so you know exactly how to take care of your growing seedling and make sure it grows into a healthy, mature cannabis plant.

What happens during the seedling stage?

Before we jump into how to care for your cannabis seedling, let’s quickly cover what happens during this grow stage.

The growing process has four key stages: the seed germination stage, the seedling stage, the vegetative stage, and the flowering stage. Once the cannabis seeds germinate and are placed into their growing medium (like a potting mix), they start to root into the soil as the stem grows upward, sprouting two cotyledon leaves, which help the plant absorb light and continue to grow.

As the plant grows, it starts to produce more fan leaves — and those leaves continue to develop the ridged edges that you’ll immediately recognize as the marijuana plant. As more leaves grow, more ridged edges develop until finally, the plant is fully grown with each leaf reaching its maximum number of edges (which can be anywhere from 5 ridges per leaf to upwards of 10).

See also  California Weed Seeds

This stage — moving from germinated cannabis seeds to cannabis plants with the maximum number of ridged edges per leaf — is the seedling stage.

The seedling stage is an incredibly important part of the growing process; because the cannabis plant is still young and fragile, proper care is essential if you want to lay the foundation for a healthy mature plant.

But what does that care look like? What are the key things to know when it comes to how to take care of marijuana seedlings?

Choose the right container

Your cannabis seedling needs space to grow. But too much space and too little space can both create problems for your plant.

If you try to grow your seedling in a container that’s too large, the root system won’t be able to absorb all the water in the soil. If you start growing your seedling in a container that’s too small, the roots won’t have space to extend and will start to wrap around themselves, which will also impact their ability to absorb water.

Choosing the right pot is an essential part of caring for your growing plant. You need a pot that’s going to give the root system space to grow, but not so much space that the roots won’t be able to absorb all the water in the soil. You should also make sure the pot has drainage holes to get rid of any excess water that could overwhelm the plant.

Choosing the right pot is an essential part of caring for your growing plant. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Be mindful of how much you water your cannabis seedlings

When it comes to watering your seedlings, you want to give them the water they need to thrive. But too much water can actually have a negative impact on the growth process, so it’s important to be mindful of how much you water your seedlings.

The root system of a seedling isn’t elaborate; the roots are small and don’t need much water to grow. Misting the plants with water once or twice a day should be plenty to give them the hydration they need to grow.

If you’re not sure how much water is too much water, keep in mind that you want the growing medium (AKA the soil) to be damp and moist — not soaked and oversaturated.

Know the signs of nutrient deficiencies

A nutrient deficiency can cause serious issues for your growing plant, so part of proper care is knowing how to spot the signs of a nutrient deficiency.

Nutrient deficiencies can come from a variety of places. “Hot” potting mixes that contain too many nutrients could cause nutrient toxicity. On the other end of the spectrum, under-watering can cause a deficiency in the key nutrients your plant needs to grow.

Some red flags that signal your seedling may have a deficiency in nutrients (or nutrient toxicity) include:

  • Dark coloring (cannabis seedlings should be a vibrant shade of green)
  • A burned appearance on the tip of the leaves
  • A curling on the tip of the leaves
  • Yellowing leaves

If you notice any of these issues with your plant, it could be the result of too many or too few nutrients. You’ll need to adjust your growing strategy to support your plant’s health.

Choose the right lighting

Like any plant, seedlings need light in order to grow and thrive. But not all light is created equal. If you want your seedling to grow into a healthy cannabis plant, you need to expose it to the right type of light.

If you’re growing your seedlings outdoors, they’ll need to be exposed to as much sunlight as possible. Keep them in the sun from sunrise to sunset; the more sunlight exposure they get, the better.

If you’re growing your seedlings outdoors, they’ll need to be exposed to as much sunlight as possible. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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But growing your seedlings outdoors can be tricky. Because you can’t control sunlight, there’s no way to ensure your cannabis seedlings are getting the light they need to grow properly. A cloudy day can prevent your seedlings from getting enough light and throw off your entire growth process.

Growing your seedlings indoors with artificial light gives you more control over the process, making it easier to ensure your plants are getting enough light each day. If you’re growing with artificial lights (compact fluorescent lights that emit cooler, blue spectrum light are especially effective), aim to give your plants 18 hours on and six hours off each day.

Keep your environment at the right temperature and humidity

Environmental conditions are essential to growing healthy cannabis seedlings, and some of the most important conditions to control are temperature and humidity.

The temperature in your grow environment shouldn’t exceed 80 degrees Fahrenheit, otherwise the seedlings may grow too tall. (You should also plan on lowering the temperature at night to about 70 degrees Fahrenheit.)

You should also aim to keep humidity in the grow environment at a higher level, typically around 70 percent. That way, the plants can absorb moisture from the environment to develop stronger roots without getting weighed down by over-watering.

Get out there and grow your seedling into a full-grown marijuana plant

Watching your cannabis seeds transform into seedlings is an exciting part of the growth process. And now that you know how to care for your cannabis seedling, you should have everything you need to transform your seedling into a mature, healthy, and flowering cannabis plant.

Stages of Growing Cannabis

Cannabis, weed, marijuana, kush, ganja – whatever you want to call it, it’s now legal to own and grow in the state of Virginia. So what does this mean for those interested in growing it?

Growing Cannabis for the first time can be quite overwhelming. A quick Google search will lead you to hundreds of results with more information than you can ever sift through. There’s so much to learn – lighting, pH, soils, training methods, curing, and so much more. Where does one start?

It’s really easy to fall down the rabbit hole of information online. The sheer amount of information can almost hinder you when you’re first getting started. I think it’s easiest to just get started and learn as you go.

Starting with gaining a general understanding of the stages of growing Cannabis is a great place to begin before you try growing for the first time. It will help you have a decent idea of what to expect along the way.

How long does Cannabis take to grow?

How long Cannabis takes to grow can vary based on the variety of the plant and conditions it is grown in. On average, from seed to harvest, it takes anywhere from 10-32 weeks (about 3-8 months). It’s a quicker process if you start with a clone (rooted cutting) or an autoflower seed. The biggest variability in how long a marijuana plant takes to grow will happen in the vegetative stage—after the seedling phase and before flowering.

See also  How To Germinate Cannabis Seeds With Hydrogen Peroxide

Stages of Growing Cannabis

Every plant begins with a seed. Cannabis seeds should be germinated just like any other seed. They can take anywhere between 3-10 days to germinate, although it can happen in as few as 24 hours or as long as 2 weeks. To germinate, you can place the seeds in a damp paper towel, which you should then place in a dark place, such as inside a drawer. Check on them after a few days to see if the primary root, called the radicle, has emerged. This will look like a little white “tail” coming out of the seed. Once germinated, move them to damp soil.

Alternatively, you can place the seeds directly in damp soil to germinate and grow, without having the trouble of moving them. For this method, I would recommend a seed starting mix. These are usually lighter and fluffier than traditional potting soil, which gives your fragile germinating seeds a start on the right foot. We carry Coast of Maine Sprout Island Blend Organic Seed Starter Mix. It has additional perlite that aerates the soil and helps prevent damping off. It also has mycorrhizae, worm castings, lobster meal, hen manure, and kelp to get your plants off to a healthy start.

2. Seedling Stage

Once your seed has germinated, it’s now time to move the germinated seed from its paper towel to a growing medium. If you started them in a seed starting mix, you will want to move them from the seed tray to a larger pot with a high-quality potting mix, such as the Coast of Maine Stonington Blend Grower’s Mix. This is a super soil, that works especially well for growing Cannabis. It contains mycorrhizae, kelp, alfalfa meal, fish bone meal, worm castings, perlite, manure, peat, coir, and lobster compost that feed your plant throughout the growing cycle, with no need to use additional nutrients.

Plants are considered seedlings for about 2-3 weeks after germination. During this time, the plant should be moved to a spot with direct sun, if growing outdoors. If growing indoors, set your grow lights to run for 16 hours a day.

3. Vegetative Stage

After the seedling stage, Cannabis plants move to a vegetative stage. This is the time when the plant focuses on leaf production. It will not produce flowers at all during this stage, as the plant needs to grow plenty of leaves to take up enough photons (sunlight) to create the necessary energy to produce large flowers. The vegetative stage can last anywhere from 3 to 16 weeks, depending on the variety.

During this stage, indoor plants need 16-18 hours of light per day, and outdoor plants need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight (“full sun”), plus several hours of indirect sunlight. They will also need plenty of Nitrogen during this point, as Nitrogen is the nutrient that promotes healthy leaf growth.

4. Flowering

The flowering stage is the last stage of the Cannabis plant life cycle. This is the time when your plant will stop putting as much energy into leaf growth and will instead focus that energy on creating the flowers (buds), which are used for medicinal and recreational purposes.

Stages of Flowering – Source: Katie Plummer

Cannabis is triggered to flower when the hours of light it receives are reduced. If you’re growing outdoors, you’re at the whim of the seasons and will have to wait until the sun starts to go down in fall for it to flower and then harvest. If you’re growing indoors, you get to play mother nature and can force your plant to flower at any point. When you’re ready for plants to start the flowering stage, change your lights to a 12/12 cycle ( 12 hours with the light on and 12 hours with it off ). You will see signs of flowering in 1-3 weeks . On average plants will be ready to harvest after 8-11 weeks of flowering.

5. Harvest

Your plant will be ready to be harvested once flowers are compact and the pistils turn orange/brown. These pistils look like “hairs” coming out of the flowers.

6. Drying

To dry your Cannabis, hang sections of the plant upside down in a dark, cool space, such as a closet. You want to aim for 55-65% humidity and 60-70°F in the spot that you’re drying your plants in. Prolonged periods of light, friction from handling, and humidity/dampness can degrade resin glands, so you will want to avoid all of these.

During the drying process, plants lose roughly 75% of water weight, which increases the cannabinoid to weight ratio. It also helps equalize moisture content, preserve cannabinoids, and shed chlorophyll.

Cannabis is ready to trim once the stem snaps when bent, typically after 3-7 days of drying.

7. Trimming

After your plant has dried, it’s time to trim! Trimming makes your fingers very sticky, so wear gloves if this is something you want to avoid. Simply trim off the larger leaves and stems. You can leave smaller sugar leaves if you’d like, as these still contain a good amount of cannabinoids and terpenes that provide the medicinal properties of Cannabis. It’s all personal preference of exactly how much you trim off. And you can save all the trimmings to make edibles, tinctures, salves, and more.

8. Curing

Curing is an essential part and the last stage in growing Cannabis. It helps the buds achieve full aroma. Curing is as simple as placing your freshly trimmed buds in a glass jar with a lid, like a mason jar. You’ll then want to place the jar in a cool, dark place, such as inside a drawer or in a cabinet.

During the first week of curing, you will want to “burp” your jars. This means you should open the containers once or twice a day for a couple minutes to allows moisture to escape and replenish the oxygen inside the container. After the first week, you only need to burp containers once every few days.

You should allow buds to cure for at least 2 weeks, but some people choose to cure for as long as 6 months. This helps stop the loss of moisture and to preserve flavors and aromas.

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